Helen E. Ownby

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Human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II (HTLV-I and -II) cause myelopathy; HTLV-I, but not HTLV-II, causes adult T-cell leukemia. Whether HTLV-II is associated with other diseases is unknown. Using survival analysis, we studied medical history data from a prospective cohort of HTLV-I- and HTLV-II-infected and -uninfected blood donors, all HIV(More)
CONTEXT Persons at risk of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection, have been classified incorrectly as HIV infected because of Western blot results, but the frequency of false-positive Western blot results is unknown. OBJECTIVES To determine the frequency of false-positive HIV-1 Western blot results in US blood donors and to make projections to(More)
BACKGROUND To determine whether human T-lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II) infection is associated with an increased incidence of bacterial infections, we prospectively observed cohorts of HTLV-I- and HTLV-II-infected and seronegative subjects in 5 US cities. METHODS Of 1340 present and former blood donors examined at enrollment, 1213 (90.5%) were(More)
One thousand seventy-eight patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer were examined for racial differences in histopathologic and clinical parameters. There were no observed differences in tumor histopathologic type or tumor endocrine status between races. There were no differences with respect to time to breast tumor recurrence observed between black(More)
As a part of a major study on the pathophysiologic indices for recurrence of human breast cancer, preoperative eosinophil and lymphocyte counts were determined on 419 and 581 primary breast cancer patients, respectively. Patients with lymphocyte counts less than or equal to 1500/mm3 and/or eosinophil counts of less than 55/mm3 had significantly higher risk(More)
Injection drug use (IDU) is a known risk factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but the strength of other parenteral and sexual risk factors is unclear. In 1997, we performed a case-control study of 2,316 HCV-seropositive blood donors and 2,316 seronegative donors matched on age, sex, race/ethnicity, blood center, and first-time versus repeat-donor(More)
Injection drug use (IDU) is a known risk factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but the strength of other parenteral and sexual risk factors is unclear. In 1997, we performed a case-control study of 2,316 HCV-seropositive blood donors and 2,316 seronegative donors matched on age, sex, race/ethnicity, blood center, and first-time versus repeat-donor(More)
We reviewed tumors from two groups of patients with breast cancer, distinguished by differences in outcome. One group (85 cases) survived more than 8.5 years without tumor recurrence; the other 85 cases had recurrent disease within 2 years. Histologic and immunocytochemical studies on all cases were performed without patient identifiers and prior to review(More)
OBJECTIVE To measure demographic determinants of hepatitis C virus (HCV) seroprevalence among blood donors in the United States. DESIGN Cross-sectional epidemiological study. SETTING Five blood centers in different regions of the United States. SUBJECTS A total of 862,398 consecutive volunteer blood donors with one or more nonautologous donations from(More)
BACKGROUND Calculations of the incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections in the blood donor setting that are based solely on data for seroconversion to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) will underestimate the incidence due to the transient nature of antigenemia. Estimates based on antibody to hepatitis B core antigen will overestimate the incidence(More)