Heiko Scheit

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The reduced transition probabilities, B(E2; 0(gs)+ -->2(1)+), have been measured in the radioactive isotopes (108,106)Sn using subbarrier Coulomb excitation at the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN. Deexcitation gamma rays were detected by the highly segmented MINIBALL Ge-detector array. The results, B(E2;0(gs)+ -->2(1)+)=0.222(19)e2b2 for 108Sn and B(E2;(More)
M. Fauerbach,* M. J. Chromik, T. Glasmacher, 1,2 P. G. Hansen, 1,2 R. W. Ibbotson, 2 D. J. Morrissey, 2,3 H. Scheit, 1,2 P. Thirolf, 4 and M. Thoennessen 1,2 Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824(More)
We report on the first low-energy Coulomb excitation measurements with radioactive Ipi=6- beams of odd-odd nuclei 68,70Cu. The beams were produced at ISOLDE, CERN and were post-accelerated by REX-ISOLDE to 2.83 MeV/nucleon. Gamma rays were detected with the MINIBALL spectrometer. The 6- beam was used to study the multiplet of states (3-, 4-, 5-, 6-) arising(More)
We report on the first spectroscopic study of the N=22 nucleus 32Ne at the newly completed RIKEN Radioactive Ion Beam Factory. A single gamma-ray line with an energy of 722(9) keV was observed in both inelastic scattering of a 226 MeV/u 32Ne beam on a carbon target and proton removal from 33Na at 245 MeV/u. This transition is assigned to the deexcitation of(More)
A. Navin,1,2 D. Bazin,1 B. A. Brown,1,3 B. Davids,1,3 G. Gervais,1,3,* T. Glasmacher,1,3 K. Govaert,1 P. G. Hansen,1,3 M. Hellström,4 R. W. Ibbotson,1 V. Maddalena,1,3 B. Pritychenko,1,3 H. Scheit,1,3 B. M. Sherrill,1,3 M. Steiner,1 J. A. Tostevin,5 and J. Yurkon1 1National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing,(More)
B. V. Pritychenko, T. Glasmacher, B. A. Brown, P. D. Cottle, R. W. Ibbotson,* K. W. Kemper, and H. Scheit National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 Department of Physics, Florida State University,(More)
The double-gamma decay is a rare electromagnetic process, where instead of a single photon two gammarays are emitted, each with a continuous energy spectrum. The sum energy of the two photons equals the transition energy. This process has so far only been observed for the decay of the first excited states of 16O, 40Ca and 90Zr [1,2], where the spin of the(More)