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Heterotrimeric G proteins have a crucial role as molecular switches in signal transduction pathways mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors. Extracellular stimuli activate these receptors, which then catalyse GTP-GDP exchange on the G protein alpha-subunit. The complex series of interactions and conformational changes that connect agonist binding to G(More)
In spite of the recognition that striatal D(2) receptors are critical determinants in a variety of psychomotor disorders, the cellular mechanisms by which these receptors shape neuronal activity have remained a mystery. The studies presented here reveal that D(2) receptor stimulation in enkephalin-expressing medium spiny neurons suppresses transmembrane(More)
The structure of a heterotrimeric G protein reveals the mechanism of the nucleotide-dependent engagement of the alpha and beta gamma subunits that regulates their interaction with receptor and effector molecules. The interaction involves two distinct interfaces and dramatically alters the conformation of the alpha but not of the beta gamma subunits. The(More)
Parkinson disease is a neurodegenerative disorder whose symptoms are caused by the loss of dopaminergic neurons innervating the striatum. As striatal dopamine levels fall, striatal acetylcholine release rises, exacerbating motor symptoms. This adaptation is commonly attributed to the loss of interneuronal regulation by inhibitory D(2) dopamine receptors.(More)
Many signalling cascades use seven-helical transmembrane receptors coupled to heterotrimeric G proteins (G alpha beta gamma) to convert extracellular signals into intracellular responses. Upon nucleotide exchange catalysed by activated receptors, heterotrimers dissociate into GTP-bound G alpha subunits and G beta gamma dimers, either of which can modulate(More)
Aluminium fluoride (AIF-4) activates members of the heterotrimeric G-protein (G alpha beta gamma) family by binding to inactive G alpha.GDP near the site occupied by the gamma-phosphate in G alpha.GTP (ref. 3). Here we describe the crystal structure of transducin alpha.GDP activated with aluminium fluoride (Gt alpha.GDP.AIF-4.H2O) at 1.7 A, a resolution(More)
The interaction between receptors and guanine nucleotide binding (G) proteins leads to G protein activation and subsequent regulation of effector enzymes. The molecular basis of receptor-G protein interaction has been examined by using the ability of the G protein from rods (transducin) to cause a conformational change in rhodopsin as an assay. Synthetic(More)
Both the ␣ and ␤␥ subunits of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding proteins (G proteins) communicate signals from receptors to effectors. G␤␥ subunits can regulate a diverse array of effectors, including ion channels and enzymes. G␣ subunits bound to guanine diphosphate (G␣-GDP) inhibit signal transduction through G␤␥ subunits, suggesting a common(More)
The activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can result in an inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent hormone and neurotransmitter secretion. This has been attributed in part to G protein inhibition of Ca(2+) influx. However, a frequently dominant inhibitory effect, of unknown mechanism, also occurs distal to Ca(2+) entry. Here we characterize direct(More)