Heather Peto

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Current clinical treatments for skeletal conditions resulting in large-scale bone loss include autograft or allograft, both of which have limited effectiveness. In seeking to address bone regeneration, several tissue engineering strategies have come to the fore, including the development of growth factor releasing technologies and appropriate animal models(More)
There is an unmet need for improved, effective tissue engineering strategies to replace or repair bone damaged through disease or injury. Recent research has focused on developing biomaterial scaffolds capable of spatially and temporally releasing combinations of bioactive growth factors, rather than individual molecules, to recapitulate repair pathways(More)
The current study has investigated the use of decellularised, demineralised bone extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel constructs for in vivo tissue mineralisation and bone formation. Stro-1-enriched human bone marrow stromal cells were incorporated together with select growth factors including VEGF, TGF-β3, BMP-2, PTHrP and VitD3, to augment bone formation,(More)
Hydrogel scaffolds derived from the extracellular matrix (ECM) of mammalian tissues have been successfully used to promote tissue repair in vitro and in vivo. The objective of this study was to evaluate the osteogenic potential of ECM hydrogels prepared from demineralized and decellularized bovine bone in the presence and absence of osteogenic medium.(More)
This paper examines the differentiation of a mouse embryonic stem cell line (CGR8) into neurons, under retinoic acid (RA) and smoothened agonist (SAG) treatment. When stem cells underwent through an embryoid body (EB) formation stage, dissociation and seeding on glass coverslips, immunofluorescent labelling for neuronal markers (Nestin, b-Tubulin III, MAP2)(More)
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