Heather E Kendall

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beta-Arrestins serve a dual regulatory role in the life cycle of G protein-coupled receptors such as the beta2-adrenergic receptor. First, they mediate rapid desensitization by binding to G protein-coupled receptor kinase-phosphorylated receptors. Second, they target the receptors for internalization into endosomal vesicles, wherein receptor(More)
The actions of many hormones and neurotransmitters are mediated by the members of a superfamily of receptors coupled to heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). These receptors are characterized by a highly conserved topographical arrangement in which seven transmembrane domains are connected by intracellular and extracellular loops.(More)
G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) desensitize G protein-coupled receptors by phosphorylating activated receptors. The six known GRKs have been classified into three subfamilies based on sequence and functional similarities. Examination of the mouse GRK4 subfamily (GRKs 4, 5, and 6) suggests that mouse GRK4 is not alternatively spliced in a manner(More)
There is growing evidence linking somatic mutational events during fetal development and childhood to an increasing number of multifactorial human diseases. Despite this, little is known about the relationship between endogenous and environmentally induced exogenous mutations during human development. Here we describe a comparative spectral analysis of(More)
The survival rates of children treated for cancer have dramatically increased after the development of standardized multiple-modality treatment protocols. As a result, there is a rapidly growing population of pediatric cancer survivors in which the long-term genotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic intervention is unknown. To study the genotoxic effects of(More)
The development of risk-directed treatment protocols over the last 25 years has resulted in an increase in the survival rates of children treated for cancer. As a consequence, there is a growing population of pediatric cancer survivors in which the long-term genotoxic effects of chemotherapy is unknown. We previously reported that children treated for acute(More)
Survival rates of children treated for cancer have increased dramatically over the last 25 years following the development of risk-directed multi-modality treatment protocols. As a result, there is a rapidly growing population of children and young adult cancer survivors in which the long-term genotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic intervention is unknown.(More)