Harvey Goldstein

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An updated system for estimating dental maturity is presented. It extends the original system (Demirjian et al., 1973) based on radiographs of 7 teeth by including two extra stages, and by enlarging the standardizing sample to include 2407 boys and 2349 girls. Percentile standards from ages 2-5 to 17-0 years are presented separately for boys and girls.(More)
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In the social and other sciences, data are often structured hierarchically. Thus, for example, workers are grouped into workplaces, individuals into households, animals into litters, and subjects can be studied repeatedly, so giving rise to measurements grouped within individuals. It has long been recognized that the existence of such 'clustering' presents(More)
Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/about/terms.html. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in(More)
This tutorial presents an overview of multilevel or hierarchical data modelling and its applications in medicine. A description of the basic model for nested data is given and it is shown how this can be extended to fit flexible models for repeated measures data and more complex structures involving cross-classifications and multiple membership patterns(More)
In this paper we explore the potential of multilevel models for meta-analysis of trials with binary outcomes for both summary data, such as log-odds ratios, and individual patient data. Conventional fixed effect and random effects models are put into a multilevel model framework, which provides maximum likelihood or restricted maximum likelihood estimation.(More)