Hartmann Harz

Katrin Rötzer2
Christian Wahl-Schott2
2Katrin Rötzer
2Christian Wahl-Schott
2Hartmut Cuny
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Second messenger-induced Ca(2+)-release from intracellular stores plays a key role in a multitude of physiological processes. In addition to 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)), Ca(2+), and cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR) that trigger Ca(2+)-release from the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER), nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) has been identified(More)
Here we present a method by which gap junction-mediated intercellular diffusion of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) molecules can be monitored in "real-time" and the cAMP permeability of different gap junction channels can be compared. Intercellular cAMP diffusion was investigated throughout this study in human HeLa cells coexpressing murine(More)
Growth cones, the terminal structures of elongating neurites, use extracellular guidance information in order to navigate to appropriate target cells. The directional information of guidance cues is transduced to a cytoplasmic gradient of messenger molecules across the growth cone leading to rearrangements of the cytoskeleton. One messenger molecule(More)
Cav1.4 channels are unique among the high voltage-activated Ca2+ channel family because they completely lack Ca2+-dependent inactivation and display very slow voltage-dependent inactivation. Both properties are of crucial importance in ribbon synapses of retinal photoreceptors and bipolar cells, where sustained Ca2+ influx through Cav1.4 channels is(More)
DNMT1 is recruited by PCNA and UHRF1 to maintain DNA methylation after replication. UHRF1 recognizes hemimethylated DNA substrates via the SRA domain, but also repressive H3K9me3 histone marks with its TTD. With systematic mutagenesis and functional assays, we could show that chromatin binding further involved UHRF1 PHD binding to unmodified H3R2. These(More)
The formation of appropriate connections between neurons and their specific targets is an essential step during development and repair of the nervous system. Growth cones are located at the leading edges of the growing neurites and respond to environmental cues in order to be guided to their final targets. Directional information can be coded by(More)
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