Harry A. Mackay

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Normally capable children were first taught to touch in sequence each of a set of five physically dissimilar stimuli (Sequence A). Another set of stimuli was then used to train sequence B. Next, direct training established conditional control of the production of the A sequence and its reversal: in the presence of one printed word, touching the stimuli in(More)
Computer-based procedures were used to examine oral naming and matching-to-sample performances in an adult with a head injury. Relatively few errors occurred when pictures were (a) named, (b) matched to dictated names presented simultaneously, (c) matched to dictation after a delay, and (d) matched to identical pictures presented simultaneously. More errors(More)
Adults with autism and young children first learned to match one-element comparison stimuli to two-element sample stimuli. Test conditions then examined whether each of the individual sample elements (a) controlled selections of the comparison stimuli to which they were related during training, (b) were interchangeable with one another as either sample or(More)
Children taught to sequence pairs of visual stimuli also performed additional sequences without direct training. In Experiment 1, the children were trained to produce a six-stimulus sequence (A > B > C > D > E > F) with one set of forms, and five overlapping two-stimulus sequences (A > B, B > C, C > D, D > E, and E > F) with another set of forms. Few of the(More)
The production of sequences by two mentally retarded adults and a normally capable preschooler was assessed after each was trained to touch five physically dissimilar and nonrepresentative forms in an experimenter-specified order (denoted A1-->A2-->A3-->A4-->A5). Performance on the 10 constituent two-term sequences was examined (e.g. A-->A2, A2-->A3,(More)
Students with mental retardation learned to write lists in order to perform a matching task that they could not do otherwise. After an initial assessment phase, reinforcement was arranged in the computerized tasks to follow selection of the six pictures that were identical to those in the six-picture samples presented. In Study 1, even though the(More)
A series of six experiments examined delayed identity matching-to-sample performances of subjects with mental retardation. The stimuli were either one or two simultaneously displayed forms. When the reinforcement contingencies required that only one form exert discriminative control, all subjects achieved high accuracy scores. However, accuracy scores were(More)
Students with mental retardation learned delayed matching to sample in which some of the trials involved complex sample stimuli, each consisting of a picture and a printed word. A touch to the sample complex removed it from the computer display and produced either picture comparisons or a choice pool of letters. If the comparisons were pictures, selecting(More)
Students with academic deficits learned delayed matching-to-sample tasks that used complex sample stimuli, each consisting of a picture and a printed word. A touch to the sample complex removed it from the computer display and produced either picture comparisons or a choice pool of letters. If the comparisons were pictures, selecting the picture identical(More)
The development of interactive programmed instruction using a microcomputer as a teaching machine is described. The program applied a constructed-response matching-to-sample procedure to computer-assisted spelling instruction and review. On each trial, subjects were presented with a sample stimulus and a choice pool consisting of 10 individual letters. In(More)