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Missing data have seriously compromised inferences from clinical trials, yet the topic has received little attention in the clinical-trial community.1 Existing regulatory guidances2-4 on the design, conduct, and analysis of clinical trials have little specific advice on how to address the problem of missing data. A recent National Research Council (NRC)(More)
This paper extends an approach for estimating the ancestry probability, the probability that an inbred line is an ancestor of a given hybrid, to account for genotyping errors. The effect of such errors on ancestry probability estimates is evaluated through simulation. The simulation study shows that if misclassification is ignored, then ancestry(More)
NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering , and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special(More)
NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special(More)
Several forensic sciences, especially of the pattern-matching kind, are increasingly seen to lack the scientific foundation needed to justify continuing admission as trial evidence. Indeed, several have been abolished in the recent past. A likely next candidate for elimination is bitemark identification. A number of DNA exonerations have occurred in recent(More)
Rob Kass presents a fascinating vision of a “post”Bayes/frequentist-controversy world in which practical utility of statistical models is the guiding principle for statistical inference. I agree with Kass on many points. In particular, Kass is correct (in my opinion) when he notes that much modern statistical work develops statistical models (the(More)
Introduction Different dimensions of visual sensitivity play different roles in visual processing. We see this neurophysiologically in the specialization of brain regions for different sorts of visual information. For example, as discussed below, the magnocellular layers of the LGN convey information about achromatic luminance variations of low spatial and(More)
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