• Publications
  • Influence
The development and evolution of butterfly wing patterns
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In formation
Insect Morphogenesis.By Fritz E. Schwalm. Karger: 1988. Pp.356. £131.90, $193.50, SwFr. 290, DM347.
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Development and evolution of adaptive polyphenisms
  • H. Nijhout
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution & development
  • 1 January 2003
SUMMARY Phenotypic plasticity is the primitive character state for most if not all traits. Insofar as developmental and physiological processes obey the laws of chemistry and physics, they will beExpand
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The development and evolution of exaggerated morphologies in insects.
We discuss a framework for studying the evolution of morphology in insects, based on the concepts of "phenotypic plasticity" and "reaction norms." We illustrate this approach with the evolution ofExpand
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The control of body size in insects.
  • H. Nijhout
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Developmental biology
  • 1 September 2003
Control mechanisms that regulate body size and tissue size have been sought at both the cellular and organismal level. Cell-level studies have revealed much about the control of cell growth and cellExpand
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Evolution of a Polyphenism by Genetic Accommodation
Polyphenisms are adaptations in which a genome is associated with discrete alternative phenotypes in different environments. Little is known about the mechanism by which polyphenisms originate. WeExpand
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Pattern formation on lepidopteran wings: determination of an eyespot.
  • H. Nijhout
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Developmental biology
  • 1 December 1980
Color patterns on lepidopteran wings are believed to be organized around a series of hypothetical foci. Foci presumably serve as sources of positional information, directing synthesis of appropriateExpand
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Stability in Real Food Webs: Weak Links in Long Loops
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optix Drives the Repeated Convergent Evolution of Butterfly Wing Pattern Mimicry
Heliconius butterfly wing pattern mimicry is driven by cis-regulatory variation of the optix gene. Mimicry—whereby warning signals in different species evolve to look similar—has long served as aExpand
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