• Publications
  • Influence
Some Genetic Aspects of Sex
  • H. Muller
  • Biology
  • The American Naturalist
  • 1 March 1932
FPROM the genetic point of view it is advantageous to begin by considering sex in the broader sense of sexuality. It is not generally realized that genetics has finally solved the age-old problem ofExpand
AN ESTIMATE OF THE MUTATIONAL DAMAGE IN MAN FROM DATA ON CONSANGUINEOUS MARRIAGES.
TLDR
Calculations are presented whereby, using death rates both from Arner's and from two other published studies of consanguineous marriages, the total mutational damage is attempted to measure, by making some assumptions about the manner in which the mutations are expressed, the amount of mutationaldamage actually expressed each generation. Expand
Our load of mutations.
  • H. Muller
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of human genetics
  • 1 June 1950
ARTIFICIAL TRANSMUTATION OF THE GENE.
  • H. Muller
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
  • 22 July 1927
THE RELATION OF RECOMBINATION TO MUTATIONAL ADVANCE.
  • H. Muller
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Mutation research
  • 1 May 1964
TLDR
It is shown that this calculation does not apply for mutant genes that act advantageously only when in some special combinations with one or more other mutant genes, and that as far as these cases of special synergism are concerned recombining lines have no evolutionary advantage over non-recombining ones. Expand
Types of visible variations induced by X-rays inDrosophila
  • H. Muller
  • Biology
  • Journal of Genetics
  • 1 July 1930
TLDR
The non-lethal "risible" mutations of course possess the greater intrbJsic interest, even though the lethals, by reason of their frequency and the comparative scarcity of "doubtful" cases, agord the geneticist the best mutation index; and some of the indliced visibles have been chosen for illustration here. Expand
Human Values.
Why Polyploidy is Rarer in Animals Than in Plants
  • H. Muller
  • Biology
  • The American Naturalist
  • 1 July 1925
TLDR
The reason for the rare occurrence of polyploidy in animals, as compared with plants, is, in essence, very simple-animals usually have two sexes which are differentiated by means of a process involving the diploid mechanism of segregation and combination. Expand
The Evolution of Genetic Systems
A MORE comprehensive and intricate mass of material has been successfully analysed and integrated in this masterly exposition of Darlington's than in any other biological treatise of such small sizeExpand
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