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Socially transmitted gut microbiota protect bumble bees against an intestinal parasite
TLDR
This work shows that the presence of a distinct resident community of bacteria in bumble bees and honey bees that is not shared with related solitary bee species protects bee hosts against a widespread and highly virulent natural parasite in an experimental setting. Expand
Bacterial Communities in Central European Bumblebees: Low Diversity and High Specificity
TLDR
The gut flora of bumblebees is apparently composed of relatively few highly specialized bacteria, indicating a strong interaction and possibly important functions with their hosts. Expand
Dynamic microbiome evolution in social bees
TLDR
The emergence of the eusocial corbiculate bees from solitary ancestors appears to coincide with the acquisition of five core gut bacterial lineages, supporting the hypothesis that host sociality facilitates the development and maintenance of specialized microbiomes. Expand
Variation in gut microbial communities and its association with pathogen infection in wild bumble bees (Bombus)
TLDR
The results indicate that Bombus species have distinctive gut communities, and community-level variation is associated with pathogen infection. Expand
Arranging the bouquet of disease: floral traits and the transmission of plant and animal pathogens.
TLDR
This work provides the first systematic review regarding how floral traits attract vectors, mediate disease establishment and evolve under complex interactions with plant mutualists that can be vectors for microbial antagonists. Expand
Genomics and host specialization of honey bee and bumble bee gut symbionts
TLDR
It is shown that the simple microbiota of eusocial bees exhibits host specificity and that coresident species in the bee gut possess complementary capabilities for energy metabolism, implying their occupancy in distinct ecological niches, and that host specificity is likely driven by multiple factors, including direct host–microbe interactions, microbe–micro be interactions, and social transmission. Expand
Gut microbiota instead of host genotype drive the specificity in the interaction of a natural host-parasite system.
TLDR
Variation in gut microbiota can be responsible for specific immune phenotypes and the evolution of gut parasites may be driven by interactions with 'microbiota types' as well as with host genotypes. Expand
Diversity and evolutionary patterns of bacterial gut associates of corbiculate bees
TLDR
It is shown experimentally that both bacterial taxa can be vertically transmitted from the mother colony to daughter queens, and social contact with nest mates after emergence from the pupa greatly facilitates this transmission; sociality may play an important role in vertical transmission and opens up the potential for co‐evolution or at least a close association of gut bacteria with their hosts. Expand
Microbiome Structure Influences Infection by the Parasite Crithidia bombi in Bumble Bees
TLDR
This study demonstrates that microbiome-mediated resistance to Crithidia is conserved across multiple bumble bee species, highlighting how intricate interactions between hosts, microbiomes, and parasites can have wide-ranging consequences for the health of ecologically important species. Expand
Metabolism of Toxic Sugars by Strains of the Bee Gut Symbiont Gilliamella apicola
TLDR
The ability to metabolize certain toxic carbohydrates is directly correlated with the presence of their respective degradation pathways, indicating that metabolic potential can be accurately predicted from genomic data in these gut symbionts. Expand
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