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Testing the Core Empirical Implications of Gottfredson and Hirschi's General Theory of Crime
In A General Theory of Crime, Gottfredson and Hirschi propose that low self-control, in interaction with criminal opportunity, is the major cause of crime. The research reported in this articleExpand
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Neighborhoods and Crime: The Dimensions of Effective Community Control
Chapter 1 Table of Contents Chapter 2 Preface Chapter 3 1 Basic Issues Chapter 4 2 The Criminal Behavior of Neighborhood Residents Chapter 5 3 Neighborhood Opportunities for Criminal Behavior ChapterExpand
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Evaluating the Dimensionality and Invariance of ”Low Self-Control”
According to Gottfredson and Hirschi's (1990) A General Theory ofCrime, all illegal activity is the manifestation of a single underlyingcause. The authors argue that inadequate child-rearing causesExpand
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Gender, Age, and Crime/Deviance: A Challenge to Self-Control Theory
Focusing on gender and age variations and using various measures of self-control and of crime/deviance, the authors' provide additional evidence concerning the strongest implications of self-controlExpand
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RELIGION, ATTRIBUTION STYLE, AND PUNITIVENESS TOWARD JUVENILE OFFENDERS*
A growing body of research shows that adherents to conservative Christian beliefs are more punitive than others in their response to crime. A frequently offered but still untested explanation is thatExpand
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Economic deprivation and neighborhood crime rates, 1960-1980
The social disorganization model of crime and delinquency generally has argued that the socioeconomic composition of neighborhoods is related to rates of illegal behavior only to the extent that itExpand
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Risk Preferences and Patriarchy: Extending Power-Control Theory
Power-control theory, at its most abstract level, links gender differences in risk preference to patriarchal family structures. In previous studies, direct tests have focused on adolescentExpand
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PROTESTANT FUNDAMENTALISM AND THE RETRIBUTIVE DOCTRINE OF PUNISHMENT
In Gregg v. Georgia in 1976, the U.S. Supreme Court declared that public opinion, including the public's presumed desire for retribution, can be a legitimate basis for penal policy. Subsequently, theExpand
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