• Publications
  • Influence
Dominance in Vertebrate Broods and Litters
  • H. Drummond
  • Biology, Psychology
    The Quarterly Review of Biology
  • 1 March 2006
TLDR
An evolutionary framework in which the species‐typical dominance relationship is determined by feeding mode, confinement, cost of subordination, and capacity for individual recognition, can be extended to mammalian litters and account for the aggression‐submission and aggression‐resistance observed in distinct populations of spotted hyenas.
A revaluation of the role of food in broodmate aggression
  • H. Drummond
  • Biology, Psychology
    Animal Behaviour
  • 1 March 2001
TLDR
There is no convincing evidence that the prey size hypothesis can explain variation among species or during development, and studies showing that heron chicks are more aggressive when prey are small are inconclusive because they did not exclude food deprivation as an alternative explanation.
Parent-offspring cooperation in the blue-footed boody (Sula nebouxii): social roles in infanticial brood reduction
TLDR
Reproduction in the blue-footed boody was examined for evidence of parent-offspring conflict over infanticidal reduction of the brood, and provisional tolerance of the junior chick by its underweight senior sib is consistent with “self-sacrifice” to increase the latter's inclusive fitness.
Reversed Sexual Size Dimorphism and Parental Care: Minimal Division of Labour in the Blue-Footed Booby
TLDR
Small size appears potentially to limit male provisioning of the brood, and is unlikely to be an adaptation for division oflabour in parental care, which casts doubt on the relevance of the division-of-labour hypothesis for adult size dimorphism.
Senescent birds redouble reproductive effort when ill: confirmation of the terminal investment hypothesis
TLDR
It is demonstrated that senescent males with poor reproductive prospects increase their effort when those prospects are threatened, whereas younger males with good reproductive prospects do not.
Simultaneous positive and negative density-dependent dispersal in a colonial bird species.
TLDR
Density of conspecifics may be an important influence on habitat selection of breeders, and dispersal may tend to carry individuals to patches where pair formation opportunities are better and negative effects of competition on reproductive success are reduced.
Non-aggressive mate guarding by the blue-footed booby: a balance of female and male control
TLDR
Behavior of males and females is consistent with other hypotheses for extensive joint nest site attendance: pairbonding, copulation access, and territory acquisition.
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