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Self-harm in England: a tale of three cities
TLDR
Multicentre monitoring of self-harm in England has demonstrated similar overall patterns ofSelf- Harm in Oxford, Manchester and Leeds, with some differences reflecting local suicide rates.
Repetition of self-harm and suicide following self-harm in children and adolescents: findings from the Multicentre Study of Self-harm in England.
TLDR
Self-cutting as a method of self-harm in children and adolescents conveys greater risk of suicide (and repetition) than self-poisoning although different methods are usually used for suicide.
Toxicity of antidepressants: rates of suicide relative to prescribing and non-fatal overdose
TLDR
There are wide differences in toxicity not only between classes of antidepressants, but also within classes.
Hospital care and repetition following self-harm: multicentre comparison of self-poisoning and self-injury.
TLDR
Hospital services offer less to people who have cut themselves, although they are far more likely to repeat, than to those who have self-poisoned, and attendance at hospital should result in psychosocial assessment of needs regardless of method of self-harm.
Ethnic differences in self-harm, rates, characteristics and service provision: three-city cohort study.
TLDR
Despite the increased risk of self-harm in young Black females fewer receive psychiatric care, and the findings have implications for assessment and appropriate management for some BME groups following self- Harm.
Correlates of Firesetting in a Community Sample of Young Adolescents
TLDR
Self-report firesetting is strongly associated with extreme antisocial behaviour in young community adolescents, in support of existing evidence from incarcerated delinquent and psychiatric populations.
The development of a population-level clinical screening tool for self-harm repetition and suicide: the ReACT Self-Harm Rule
TLDR
A clinical tool to help identify patients at higher risk of repeat self- Harm, or suicide, within 6 months of an ED self-harm presentation, derived using multicentre data from a prospective cohort study is developed.
Aggressive behaviour in the high-secure forensic setting: the perceptions of patients.
TLDR
It is suggested that social and organizational factors need to be addressed to change the punitive subculture inherent in forensic psychiatric facilities, and to ensure a balance between security and effective therapy.
Staff and patient perceptions of seclusion: has anything changed?
TLDR
The disagreement between staff and patients highlights the need for greater dialogue between these groups, and nursing staff require greater understanding of how patients feel about seclusion.
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