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High-throughput screens have begun to reveal the protein interaction network that underpins most cellular functions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. How the organization of this network affects the evolution of the proteins that compose it is a fundamental question in molecular evolution. We show that the connectivity of well-conserved proteins in the(More)
Defining the transcriptome, the repertoire of transcribed regions encoded in the genome, is a challenging experimental task. Current approaches, relying on sequencing of ESTs or cDNA libraries, are expensive and labor-intensive. Here, we present a general approach for ab initio discovery of the complete transcriptome of the budding yeast, based only on the(More)
The evolutionary rates of proteins vary over several orders of magnitude. Recent work suggests that analysis of large data sets of evolutionary rates in conjunction with the results from high-throughput functional genomic experiments can identify the factors that cause proteins to evolve at such dramatically different rates. To this end, we estimated the(More)
All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or "noise." Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein(More)
Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another,(More)
Evolution at silent sites is often used to estimate the pace of selectively neutral processes or to infer differences in divergence times of genes. However, silent sites are subject to selection in favor of preferred codons, and the strength of such selection varies dramatically across genes. Here, we use the relationship between codon bias and synonymous(More)
BACKGROUND It has been shown for an evolutionarily distant genomic comparison that the number of protein-protein interactions a protein has correlates negatively with their rates of evolution. However, the generality of this observation has recently been challenged. Here we examine the problem using protein-protein interaction data from the yeast(More)