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Thousands of mutations are identified yearly. Although many directly affect protein expression, an increasing proportion of mutations is now believed to influence mRNA splicing. They mostly affect existing splice sites, but synonymous, non-synonymous or nonsense mutations can also create or disrupt splice sites or auxiliary cis-splicing sequences. To(More)
Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder. Diagnostic criteria of neonatal MFS (nMFS), the most severe form, are still debated. The aim of our study was to search for clinical and molecular prognostic factors that could be associated with length of survival. Probands ascertained via the framework of the Universal Marfan(More)
  • L Faivre, R J Gorlin, +8 authors V Cormier-Daire
  • 2003
Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) is a connective tissue disorder characterised by short stature, brachydactyly, joint stiffness, and characteristic eye anomalies including microspherophakia, ectopia of the lenses, severe myopia, and glaucoma. Both autosomal recessive (AR) and autosomal dominant (AD) modes of inheritance have been described and a gene for AR(More)
BACKGROUND TGFBR2 mutations were recognized recently among patients with a Marfan-like phenotype. The associated clinical and prognostic spectra remain unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS Clinical features and outcomes of 71 patients with a TGFBR2 mutation (TGFBR2 group) were compared with 50 age- and sex-matched unaffected family members (control subjects) and(More)
From a large series of 1009 probands with pathogenic FBN1 mutations, data for 320 patients <18 years of age at the last follow-up evaluation were analyzed (32%). At the time of diagnosis, the median age was 6.5 years. At the last examination, the population was classified as follows: neonatal Marfan syndrome, 14%; severe Marfan syndrome, 19%; classic Marfan(More)
The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) plays a pivotal role in cholesterol homeostasis. Mutations in the LDLr gene (LDLR), which is located on chromosome 19, cause familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by severe hypercholesterolemia associated with premature coronary atherosclerosis. To date almost 300(More)
Marfan syndrome is an extracellular matrix disorder with cardinal manifestations in the eye, skeleton and cardiovascular systems associated with defects in the gene encoding fibrillin (FBN1) at 15q21.1 (ref. 1). A second type of the disorder (Marfan syndrome type 2; OMIM 154705) is associated with a second locus, MFS2, at 3p25-p24.2 in a large French family(More)
Mutations in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene cause Marfan syndrome (MFS) and have been associated with a wide range of overlapping phenotypes. Clinical care is complicated by variable age at onset and the wide range of severity of aortic features. The factors that modulate phenotypical severity, both among and within families, remain to be determined. The(More)
Fibrillin is the major component of extracellular microfibrils. Mutations in the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 (FBN1) were first described in the heritable connective disorder, Marfan syndrome (MFS). FBN1 has also been shown to harbor mutations related to a spectrum of conditions phenotypically related to MFS, called "type-1 fibrillinopathies." In 1995,(More)
The human genome is thought to contain about 80,000 genes and presently only 3,000 are known to be implicated in genetic diseases. In the near future, the entire sequence of the human genome will be available and the development of new methods for point mutation detection will lead to a huge increase in the identification of genes and their mutations(More)