Gustavo D . Aguirre

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The relationship between the neurosensory photoreceptors and the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) controls not only normal retinal function, but also the pathogenesis of hereditary retinal degenerations. The molecular bases for both primary photoreceptor and RPE diseases that cause blindness have been identified. Gene therapy has been used(More)
The canine disease, X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (XLPRA), is similar to human RP3, an X-linked form of retinitis pigmentosa, and maps to the same region in the X chromosome. Analysis of the physical map of the XLPRA and RP3 intervals shows a high degree of conservation in terms of genes and their order. We have found different mutations in exon(More)
We have found two immunologically distinguishable cone types in the retina of the mouse, each localized to two opposite halves of the eye. One cone type was labelled by the monoclonal antibody COS-1 specific to the middle-to-long wave sensitive visual pigment of the mammals, while the other type was stained by the shortwave-specific monoclonal antibody(More)
Purebred strains, pronounced phenotypic variation, and a high incidence of heritable disease make the domestic dog uniquely suited to complement genetic analyses in humans and mice. A comprehensive genetic linkage map would afford many opportunities in dogs, ranging from the positional cloning of disease genes to the dissection of quantitative differences(More)
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (prcd) is a late-onset, autosomal recessive photoreceptor degeneration of dogs and a homolog for some forms of human retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Previously, the disease-relevant interval was reduced to a 106-kb region on CFA9, and a common phenotype-specific haplotype was identified in all affected dogs from several(More)
Cone degeneration (cd ) is an autosomal recessive canine disease that occurs naturally in the Alaskan Malamute and German Shorthaired Pointer breeds. It is phenotypically similar to human achromatopsia, a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder associated with three distinct loci. Both the canine disease and its human counterparts are characterized by(More)
Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) associated with retinal pigment epithelium-specific protein 65 kDa (RPE65) mutations is a severe hereditary blindness resulting from both dysfunction and degeneration of photoreceptors. Clinical trials with gene augmentation therapy have shown partial reversal of the dysfunction, but the effects on the degeneration are not(More)
The features of modern dog breeds that increase the ease of mapping common diseases, such as reduced heterogeneity and extensive linkage disequilibrium, may also increase the difficulty associated with fine mapping and identifying causative mutations. One way to address this problem is by combining data from multiple breeds segregating the same trait after(More)
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (prcd) is the most widespread hereditary retinal disease leading to blindness in dogs and phenotypically is the canine counterpart of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in humans. In previous efforts to identify the genetic locus for prcd, the canine homologs for many of the genes causally associated with RP in humans, such as RHO,(More)
PURPOSE To clone and characterize the canine RPE65 cDNA from normal dog, examine for mutations, and establish if the mutation identified in Swedish briard dogs with retinal dystrophy is present in dogs of the same breed that originated from the United States and other countries, and are affected with congenital stationary night blindness. METHODS Fifteen(More)