Guénola Drillon

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Reconstructing synteny blocks is an essential step in comparative genomics studies. Different methods were already developed to answer various needs such as genome (re-)annotation, identification of duplicated regions and whole genome duplication events or estimation of rearrangement rates. We present SynChro, a tool that reconstructs synteny blocks between(More)
As the elementary building block of eukaryotic chromatin, the nucleosome is at the heart of the compromise between the necessity of compacting DNA in the cell nucleus and the required accessibility to regulatory proteins. The recent availability of genome-wide experimental maps of nucleosome positions for many different organisms and cell types has provided(More)
Recently, a physical model of nucleosome formation based on sequence-dependent bending properties of the DNA double-helix has been used to reveal some enrichment of nucleosome-inhibiting energy barriers (NIEBs) nearby ubiquitous human “master” replication origins. Here we use this model to predict the existence of about 1.6 millions NIEBs over the 22 human(More)
Recent analysis of genome-wide epigenetic modification data, mean replication timing (MRT) profiles and chromosome conformation data in mammals have provided increasing evidence that flexibility in replication origin usage is regulated locally by the epigenetic landscape and over larger genomic distances by the 3D chromatin architecture. Here, we review the(More)
Reconstructing genome history is complex but necessary to reveal quantitative principles governing genome evolution. Such reconstruction requires recapitulating into a single evolutionary framework the evolution of genome architecture and gene repertoire. Here, we reconstructed the genome history of the genus Lachancea that appeared to cover a continuous(More)
We studied synteny conservation between 18 yeast species and 13 vertebrate species in order to provide a comparative analysis of the chromosomal plasticity in these 2 phyla. By computing the regions of conserved synteny between all pairwise combinations of species within each group, we show that in vertebrates, the number of conserved synteny blocks(More)
Besides their large-scale organization in isochores, mammalian genomes display megabase-sized regions, spanning both genes and intergenes, where the strand nucleotide composition asymmetry decreases linearly, possibly due to replication activity. These so-called skew-N domains cover about a third of the human genome and are bordered by two skew upward jumps(More)
Scleractinian corals are the foundation species of the coral-reef ecosystem. Their calcium carbonate skeletons form extensive structures that are home to millions of species, making coral reefs one of the most diverse ecosystems of our planet. However, our understanding of how reef-building corals have evolved the ability to calcify and become the ecosystem(More)
We studied synteny conservation between 18 yeast species and 13 vertebrate species in order to provide a comparative analysis of the chromosomal plasticity in these 2 phyla. By computing the regions of conserved synteny between all pairwise combinations of species within each group, we show that in vertebrates, the number of conserved synteny blocks(More)
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