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Werner syndrome (WS) is the hallmark premature aging syndrome in which the patients appear much older than their actual chronological age. The disorder is associated with significantly increased genome instability and with transcriptional deficiencies. There has been some uncertainty about whether WS cells are defective in DNA repair. We thus examined(More)
Werner Syndrome is a premature aging disorder characterized by genomic instability, elevated recombination, and replication defects. It has been hypothesized that defective processing of certain replication fork structures by WRN may contribute to genomic instability. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analyses show that WRN and Flap(More)
To understand the mechanism involved in the coordination of the sequential repair reactions that lead to long-patch BER, we have investigated interactions between proteins involved in this pathway. We find that human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) physically interacts with flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and with proliferating cell nuclear antigen. An oligonucleotide(More)
Werner syndrome (WS) is a human premature aging disorder characterized by chromosomal instability. The cellular defects of WS presumably reflect compromised or aberrant function of a DNA metabolic pathway that under normal circumstances confers stability to the genome. We report a novel interaction of the WRN gene product with the human 5' flap(More)
The base excision repair (BER) pathway is essential for the removal of DNA bases damaged by alkylation or oxidation. A key step in BER is the processing of an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site intermediate by an AP endonuclease. The major AP endonuclease in human cells (APE1, also termed HAP1 and Ref-1) accounts for >95% of the total AP endonuclease activity,(More)
In mammalian cells, single-base lesions, such as uracil and abasic sites, appear to be repaired by at least two base excision repair (BER) subpathways: "single-nucleotide BER" requiring DNA synthesis of just one nucleotide and "long patch BER" requiring multi-nucleotide DNA synthesis. In single-nucleotide BER, DNA polymerase beta (beta-pol) accounts for(More)
Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) is an abundant nuclear protein with a high affinity for single- and double-strand DNA breaks. Its binding to strand breaks promotes catalysis of the covalent modification of nuclear proteins with poly(ADP-ribose) synthesised from NAD(+). PARP-1-knockout cells are extremely sensitive to alkylating agents, suggesting the(More)
Cellular DNA repair is a frontline system that is responsible for maintaining genome integrity and thus preventing premature aging and cancer by repairing DNA lesions and strand breaks caused by endogenous and exogenous mutagens. However, it is also the principal cellular system in cancer cells that counteracts the killing effect of the major cancer(More)
Repair of both normal and reduced AP sites is activated by AP endonuclease, which recognizes and cleaves a phosphodiester bond 5' to the AP site. For a short period of time an incised AP site is occupied by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and then DNA polymerase beta adds one nucleotide into the repair gap and simultaneously removes the 5'-sugar phosphate.(More)
Base excision repair (BER) is the major pathway for processing of simple lesions in DNA, including single-strand breaks, base damage, and base loss. The scaffold protein XRCC1, DNA polymerase beta, and DNA ligase IIIalpha play pivotal roles in BER. Although all these enzymes are essential for development, their cellular levels must be tightly regulated(More)