Gregory Peter Harmer

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We introduce Parrondo’s paradox that involves games of chance. We consider two fair gambling games, A and B, both of which can be made to have a losing expectation by changing a biasing parameter « . When the two games are played in any alternating order, a winning expectation is produced, even though A and B are now losing games when played individually.(More)
Based on Brownian ratchets, a counterintuitive phenomenon has recently emerged —namely, that two losing games can yield, when combined, a paradoxical tendency to win. A restriction of this phenomenon is that the rules depend on the current capital of the player. Here we present new games where all the rules depend only on the history of the game and not on(More)
Noise in dynamical systems is usually considered a nuisance. However, in certain nonlinear systems, including electronic circuits and biological sensory systems, the presence of noise can enhance the detection of weak signals. The phenomenon is termed stochastic resonance and is of great interest for electronic instrumentation. We review and investigate the(More)
In certain dynamical systems, the addition of noise can assist the detection of a signal and not degrade it as normally expected. This is possible via a phenomenon termed stochastic resonance (SR) . The response of a nonlinear system to a sub-threshold periodic input signal is optimal for some non-zero value of noise intensity. Using the signal-to-noise(More)
The feasibility of thick-film chemical sensors based on various semiconductor metal oxides to reliably detect chemical warfare agents has been studied. Nanocrystalline semiconductor metal oxide (SMO) powders were used as initial materials for the sensors’ fabrication. The thick films were prepared using a simple drop-coating technique accompanied with in(More)
Parrondo’s games present an apparently paradoxical situation where individually losing games can be combined to win. In this article we analyze the case of two coin tossing games. Game B is played with two biased coins and has state-dependent rules based on the player’s current capital. Game B can exhibit detailed balance or even negative drift ~i.e.,(More)
Passive millimeter—wave detection is advantageous for detection of objects obscured by rain, steam or other aerosols. This coupled together with collision avoidance techniques, based on biologically inspired insect vision models, promises compact low—cost solutions that do not require hardware—intensive image processing. This paper examines a number of(More)
It has been shown that it is possible to construct two games that when played individually lose, but alternating randomly or deterministically between them can win. This apparent paradox has been dubbed “Parrondo’s paradox.” The original games are capital dependent, which means that the winning and losing probabilities depend on how much capital the player(More)
We introduce Parrondo's paradox that involves games of chance. We consider two fair games, A and B, both of which can be made to lose by changing a biasing parameter. The apparently paradoxical situation arises when the two games are played in any alternating order. A winning expectation is produced, even though both games A and B are losing when we play(More)
Passive millimeter—wave detection is advantageous for detection of objects obscured by rain, steam or other aerosols. This coupled together with collision avoidance techniques, based on biologically inspired insect vision models, promises compact low—cost solutions that do not require hardware—intensive image processing. This paper examines a number of(More)