Graham F. Welch

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Congenital amusia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of musical perception and production. Much research has focused on characterizing the deficits within this special population; however, it is also important from both a psychological and educational perspective to determine which aspects of the disorder may be subject to change because this will also(More)
BACKGROUND The Western classical training of many secondary music specialist teachers may be inappropriate for the demands of the contemporary secondary school classroom, leading to a conflict between their self-concepts as 'musicians' and as 'teachers'. AIMS To undertake a short-term longitudinal comparison of the developing identities and the attitudes(More)
This paper examines the relationship between six secondary school teachers " backgrounds and their perceptions of musical creativity. A unit of work involving composition and improvisation activities with pupils aged 11-14 was videotaped for each teacher. Participants were invited to comment on the videotapes during interviews, which were subsequently(More)
This paper forms part of a larger study into the nature of singing development in children and examines gender differences in long-term average spectra (LTAS). Three hundred and twenty children in age groups 4-11 years learned a song and were then recorded singing alone. LTAS curves were calculated for each voice. Age of each singer was estimated and gender(More)
Customarily, speaking and singing have tended to be regarded as two completely separate sets of behaviors in clinical and educational settings. The treatment of speech and voice disorders has focused on the client's speaking ability, as this is perceived to be the main vocal behavior of concern. However, according to a broader voice-science perspective,(More)
There is a growing body of neurological, cognitive, and social psychological research to suggest the possibility of positive transfer effects from structured musical engagement. In particular, there is evidence to suggest that engagement in musical activities may impact on social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated). Tackling social(More)
been a topic of both practical and empirical concern for music educators for many years. Earlier efforts focused either on interventions that might help students develop the skills (Joyner, 1969; Yank Porter, 1977) or age-related changes in singing accuracy and proposed models for how such skills might develop (Welch, 1985; 1986). More recently, music(More)
The core cognitive difficulty in developmental dyslexia involves phonological processing, but adults and children with dyslexia also have sensory impairments. Impairments in basic auditory processing show particular links with phonological impairments, and recent studies with dyslexic children across languages reveal a relationship between auditory temporal(More)