Learn More
Genome-wide scans for recent positive selection in humans have yielded insight into the mechanisms underlying the extensive phenotypic diversity in our species, but have focused on a limited number of populations. Here, we present an analysis of recent selection in a global sample of 53 populations, using genotype data from the Human Genome Diversity-CEPH(More)
Loci involved in local adaptation can potentially be identified by an unusual correlation between allele frequencies and important ecological variables or by extreme allele frequency differences between geographic regions. However, such comparisons are complicated by differences in sample sizes and the neutral correlation of allele frequencies across(More)
Comparing allele frequencies among populations that differ in environment has long been a tool for detecting loci involved in local adaptation. However, such analyses are complicated by an imperfect knowledge of population allele frequencies and neutral correlations of allele frequencies among populations due to shared population history and gene flow. Here(More)
The beneficial substitution of an allele shapes patterns of genetic variation at linked sites. Thus, in principle, adaptations can be mapped by looking for the signature of directional selection in polymorphism data. In practice, such efforts are hampered by the need for an accurate characterization of the demographic history of the species and of the(More)
Evolutionary pressures due to variation in climate play an important role in shaping phenotypic variation among and within species and have been shown to influence variation in phenotypes such as body shape and size among humans. Genes involved in energy metabolism are likely to be central to heat and cold tolerance. To test the hypothesis that climate(More)
Theories to explain the prevalence of sex and recombination have long been a central theme of evolutionary biology. Yet despite decades of attention dedicated to the evolution of sex and recombination, the widespread pattern of sex differences in the recombination rate is not well understood and has received relatively little theoretical attention. Here, we(More)
There has long been interest in understanding the genetic basis of human adaptation. To what extent are phenotypic differences among human populations driven by natural selection? With the recent arrival of large genome-wide data sets on human variation, there is now unprecedented opportunity for progress on this type of question. Several lines of evidence(More)
Considerable interest is focused on the use of polymorphism data to identify regions of the genome that underlie recent adaptations. These searches are guided by a simple model of positive selection, in which a mutation is favored as soon as it arises. This assumption may not be realistic, as environmental changes and range expansions may lead previously(More)
Recombination has essential functions in mammalian meiosis, which impose several constraints on the recombination process. However, recent studies have shown that, in spite of these roles, recombination rates vary tremendously among humans, and show marked differences between humans and closely related species. These findings provide important insights into(More)
UNLABELLED SelSim is a program for Monte Carlo simulation of DNA polymorphism data for a recombining region within which a single bi-allelic site has experienced natural selection. SelSim allows simulation from either a fully stochastic model of, or deterministic approximations to, natural selection within a coalescent framework. A number of different(More)