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Axonal loss is thought to be a likely cause of persistent disability after a multiple sclerosis relapse; therefore, noninvasive in vivo markers specific for axonal loss are needed. We used optic neuritis as a model of multiple sclerosis relapse to quantify axonal loss of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and secondary retinal ganglion cell loss in the(More)
Familial British dementia (FBD), previously designated familial cerebral amyloid angiopathy-British type, is an autosomal dominant disorder of undetermined origin characterized by progressive dementia, spasticity, and cerebellar ataxia, with onset at around the fifth decade of life. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy, non-neuritic and perivascular plaques and(More)
Familial Danish dementia (FDD), also known as heredopathia ophthalmo-oto-encephalica, is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by cataracts, deafness, progressive ataxia, and dementia. Neuropathological findings include severe widespread cerebral amyloid angiopathy, hippocampal plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles, similar to Alzheimer's disease.(More)
Axonal loss is thought to be the predominant cause of disability in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). The retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) is composed largely of unmyelinated axons of retinal ganglion cells, and is accessible to study with optical coherence tomography (OCT), giving a measure of axonal loss. OCT measures of the RNFL thickness (RNFLT) and(More)
Normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in established multiple sclerosis has been shown to be abnormal using a variety of magnetic resonance (MR) techniques, including proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), although the stage at which these changes first appear is less clear. Using a 1.5 T scanner and single-voxel (1)H-MRS [TR 3000 ms, TE 30 ms, point-resolved(More)
Amyloid deposition can take place in the walls of arteries, arterioles, and, less often, capillaries and veins of the central nervous system, a phenomenon known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). The major clinicopathological manifestations of CAA include cerebral hemorrhage, ischemic lesions, and dementia. CAA may be classified according to the amyloid(More)
While brain atrophy occurs early in the clinical course of multiple sclerosis, exactly how early, which tissues are affected and the rate at which early atrophy occurs are unclear. Regional brain atrophy was investigated in 58 patients recruited within 3 months of onset of a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) suggestive of multiple sclerosis, who were(More)
In cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), amyloid fibrils deposit in walls of arteries, arterioles and less frequently in veins and capillaries of the central nervous system, often resulting in secondary degenerative vascular changes. Although the amyloid-β peptide is by far the commonest amyloid subunit implicated in sporadic and rarely in hereditary forms of(More)
We describe the clinical characteristics and early natural history of a form of inflammatory optic neuropathy which is frequently bilateral and often painful, and is characterized by relapses and remissions. MRI scans of the brain are normal and those of the optic nerves often, but not always, show high signal abnormalities which enhance. The symptoms and(More)