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In order to observe changes owing to aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the volumes of subdivisions of the hippocampus and the number of neurons of the hippocampal formation, 18 normal brains from subjects who died of nonneurological causes and had no history of long-term illness or dementia (ten of these brains comprised the aged control group) and 13(More)
The major mechanism for generating diversity of neuronal connections beyond their genetic determination is the activity-dependent stabilization and selective elimination of the initially overproduced synapses [Changeux JP, Danchin A (1976) Nature 264:705-712]. The largest number of supranumerary synapses has been recorded in the cerebral cortex of human and(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by extracellular deposits of amyloid β-peptides (Aβ) and intracellular deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau (phospho-tau) protein. Ceramides, the major molecules of sphingolipid metabolism and lipid second messengers, have been associated with AD(More)
Although substantial evidence indicates that the progression of pathological changes of the neuronal cytoskeleton is crucial in determining the severity of dementia in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the exact causes and evolution of these changes, the initial site at which they begin, and the neuronal susceptibility levels for their development are poorly(More)
Recent neuroanatomical and neurophysiological studies in man have revealed ontogenetic events which coincide with broadly defined phases of behavioral and cognitive development. During the early fetal period, early produced neurons make initial synapses which form the basis for the earliest electrical activity of the human brain. The overall immaturity of(More)
The immunocytochemical distribution of the neuronal form of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) was compared with neuropathological changes and with cell death related DNA damage (as revealed by in situ end labeling, ISEL) in the hippocampal formation and entorhinal cortex of 12 age-matched control subjects and 12 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Unlike(More)
The small magnocellular group located within the rostrolateral extension of the basal forebrain was named and described as the nucleus subputaminalis in the human and chimpanzee brain by Ayala. Analysis of cytoarchitectonic and cytochemical characteristics of this cell group has been largely disregarded in both classical and more current studies. We(More)
Werdnig-Hoffmann disease (WHD) is the most severe clinical type of spinal muscular atrophy characterized by loss of lower motor neurons and paralysis. We examined the hypothesis that disease pathogenesis is based on an inappropriate persistence of normally occurring motor neuron programmed cell death. The diagnosis of WHD was made on the basis of clinical(More)
We have analyzed all available data including birth certificates, maternity records, pediatric records, and pathology reports of spontaneous and induced abortions and newborn deaths to determine the frequency of congenital anomalies of the central nervous system. We found 76 infants (34 males, 39 females and 3 of undetermined sex) with CNS anomalies during(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the two most common causes of dementia in old people. They remain difficult to differentiate in practice because of lack of sensitivity and specificity of current clinical diagnostic criteria. Recent molecular and cellular advancements indicate that the use of cerebrospinal fluid markers may improve(More)