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Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a neurotrophic factor with important effects in survival and differentiation of dopaminergic neurons that has been suggested to play important roles in drug of abuse-induced neurotoxicity. To test this hypothesis, we have studied the effects of amphetamine (10 mg/kg, four times, every 2 h) on the nigrostriatal pathway of PTN(More)
Midkine (MK), a neurotrophic factor with important roles in survival and differentiation of dopaminergic neurons, is upregulated in different brain areas after administration of different drugs of abuse suggesting MK could modulate drugs of abuse-induced pharmacological or neuroadaptative effects. To test this hypothesis, we have studied the effects of(More)
Pleiotrophin (PTN), a neurotrophic factor with important roles in survival and differentiation of dopaminergic neurons, is up-regulated in the nucleus accumbens after amphetamine administration suggesting that PTN could modulate amphetamine-induced pharmacological or neuroadaptative effects. To test this hypothesis, we have studied the effects of(More)
The neuropathic pain syndrome is complex. Current drugs to treat neuropathic pain, including anticonvulsivants and antidepressants, fail in up to 40-50% of the patients, while in the rest of them total alleviation is not normally achieved. Increased research advances in the neurobiology of neuropathic pain have not translated in more successful(More)
Amphetamine treatment during adolescence causes long-term cognitive deficits in rats. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a cytokine with important roles in the modulation of synaptic plasticity, whose levels of expression are significantly regulated by amphetamine administration. To test the possibility that the long-term consequences of periadolescent amphetamine(More)
Parkinson´s disease (PD) is generally a sporadic disease, and only a small proportion of cases have a clear genetic component. During the last few years, a possible specific cause triggering death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, drug of abuse-induced neurotoxicity, is being considered as a potential mechanism to develop PD, especially in(More)
The alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine is known to oppose to several pharmacological effects of opioid drugs, but the consequences and the mechanisms involved remain to be clearly established. In the present study we have checked the effects of yohimbine on morphine-induced alterations of the expression of key proteins (glial fibrillary acidic(More)
striatum of rodents in experimental models of Parkinson's disease. Interestingly, immunohistochemical studies have shown increased levels of PTN expression in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease. Since, in other contexts, PTN has been shown to be critical in repair processes in the injured nervous system, the antecedents suggest that(More)
Lewis and Fischer 344 (F344) rats differ in their physiological and pharmacological responses to a variety of environmental stimuli, which have been partially attributed to endogenous opioid function. Since opioid and alpha(2)-adrenoceptor mechanisms are closely related, we have comparatively examined the contribution of both systems to antinociception in(More)
Pleiotrophin and midkine are two recently discovered growth factors that promote survival and differentiation of catecholaminergic neurons. Chronic opioid stimulation has been reported to induce marked alterations of the locus coeruleus-hippocampus noradrenergic pathway, an effect that is prevented when opioids are coadministered with the(More)