Glenn Hoetker

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How do firms select a supplier for an innovative component? Three literatures speak to this question. Transaction cost economics focuses on the value of internalization, the literature on inter-firm relationships on the value of past relationships, and the firm capabilities literature on the value of superior capabilities. Choosing a supplier means choosing(More)
The tacit assumption that increased product modularity is associated with advantageous increases in organizational modularity underlies much of the literature on modularity. Previous empirical investigations of this assumption, few in number, have faced numerous confounding factors and generated conflicting results. I build a causal model for the(More)
The innovative knowledge created by firms that ultimately exit their industries represents a source of technology that existing firms may build on. However, no empirical work has examined if such knowledge dies with an innovating firm or if significant diffusion of knowledge occurs even after a firm exits an industry. We base our theoretical predictions(More)
Recent studies in organization theory and business strategy argue that the structure of a firm's network of inter-organizational relationships can both help and harm the firm's performance. We examine how three aspects of network structure affect supplier survival in the U.S. automobile industry, focusing on relationship duration, supplier autonomy, and(More)
Almost every business network exists in the context of a larger organizational population, but research has not produced a clear understanding of how similar firms outside a focal network influence the performance of network members. The existing literature offers two conflicting arguments and sets of results. One approach views the direct and indirect ties(More)
M in product design and flexible supply chains is increasingly common in buyer–supplier relationships. Although the benefits of supply chain flexibility and component modularity for end-product manufacturers are accepted, little is known about their impact on suppliers. We advance the literature on modularity by exploring how three aspects of a supplier’s(More)
The logit and probit models are critical parts of the management researcher's analytical arsenal. We often want to know if a covariate has the same effect for different groups, e.g., foreign and domestic firms. Unfortunately, many attempts to compare the effect of covariates across groups make the unwarranted assumption that each group has the same residual(More)
Do bankruptcy changes in the institutional environment affect the rate of founding by particular types of founders and the performance of their ventures? We take advantage of a quasi-natural experiment in Japan where changes to bankruptcy laws reduced the consequences of closing a firm. We define elite entrepreneurs as those from the top ten universities in(More)
Almost every business network exists in the context of a larger population of similar organizations, but research has not produced a clear understanding of how simila r firms outside a focal network influence the performance of network members. We use the term extra-network firms to refer to firms that are similar to those in the focal firm’s network, but(More)
How to valuate accurately a new venture is a critical and under−researched question in entrepreneurial financing. Leveraging established theories in strategic management, this research study develops an integrative theoretical framework to examine whether venture capitalists’ valuation of a new venture can be explained by variables identified in the(More)