Giovanni Viglietta

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We establish some general schemes relating the computational complexity of a video game to the presence of certain common elements or mechanics, such as destroyable paths, collectible items, doors opened by keys or activated by buttons or pressure plates, etc. Then we apply such “metatheorems” to several video games published between 1980 and 1998,(More)
Robots with lights is a model of autonomous mobile computational entties operating in the plane in Look-Compute-Move cycles: each agent has an externally visible light which can assume colors from a fixed set; the lights are persistent (i.e., the color is not erased at the end of a cycle), but otherwise the agents are oblivious. The investigation of(More)
We study the rendezvous problem for two robots moving in the plane (or on a line). Robots are autonomous, anonymous, oblivious, and carry colored lights that are visible to both. We consider deterministic distributed algorithms in which robots do not use distance information, but try to reduce (or increase) their distance by a constant factor, depending on(More)
Consider a finite set of identical computational entities that can move freely in the Euclidean plane operating in Look-Compute-Move cycles. Let p(t) denote the location of entity p at time t; entity p can see entity q at time t if at that time no other entity lies on the line segment p(t)q(t). We consider the basic problem called Mutual Visibility:(More)
We prove NP-hardness results for five of Nintendo’s largest video game franchises: Mario, Donkey Kong, Legend of Zelda, Metroid, and Pokémon. Our results apply to generalized versions of Super Mario Bros. 1–3, The Lost Levels, and Super Mario World; Donkey Kong Country 1–3; all Legend of Zelda games; all Metroid games; and all Pokémon role-playing games. In(More)
Consider a set of n 6= 4 simple autonomous mobile robots (decentralized, asynchronous, no common coordinate system, no identities, no central coordination, no direct communication, no memory of the past, deterministic) initially in distinct locations, moving freely in the plane and able to sense the positions of the other robots. We study the primitive task(More)
Consider a finite set of identical entities, called robots, which can move freely in the Euclidean plane. Let p(t) denote the location of robot p at time t; a robot p can see robot q at time t if at that time no other robot lies in the line segment p(t)q(t). We consider the basic problem called Mutual Visibility: starting from arbitrary distinct locations,(More)
Consider a set of n finite set of simple autonomous mobile robots (asynchronous, no common coordinate system, no identities, no central coordination, no direct communication, no memory of the past, non-rigid, deterministic) initially in distinct locations, moving freely in the plane and able to sense the positions of the other robots. We study the primitive(More)
Gathering mobile robots is a widely studied problem in robotic research. This survey first introduces the related work, summarizing models and results. Then, the focus shifts on the open problem of gathering fat robots. In this context, “fat” means that the robot is not represented by a point in a bidimensional space, but it has an extent. Moreover, it can(More)