Gijsbertus T. J. van der Horst

Learn More
We show that, in the mouse, the core mechanism for the master circadian clock consists of interacting positive and negative transcription and translation feedback loops. Analysis of Clock/Clock mutant mice, homozygous Period2(Brdm1) mutants, and Cryptochrome-deficient mice reveals substantially altered Bmal1 rhythms, consistent with a dominant role of(More)
XPF-ERCC1 endonuclease is required for repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions and cytotoxic DNA interstrand crosslinks. Mild mutations in XPF cause the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum. A patient presented with a severe XPF mutation leading to profound crosslink sensitivity and dramatic progeroid symptoms. It is not known how unrepaired DNA(More)
Many biochemical, physiological and behavioural processes show circadian rhythms which are generated by an internal time-keeping mechanism referred to as the biological clock. According to rapidly developing models, the core oscillator driving this clock is composed of an autoregulatory transcription-(post) translation-based feedback loop involving a set of(More)
REC8 is a key component of the meiotic cohesin complex. During meiosis, cohesin is required for the establishment and maintenance of sister-chromatid cohesion, for the formation of the synaptonemal complex, and for recombination between homologous chromosomes. We show that REC8 has an essential role in mammalian meiosis, in that Rec8 null mice of both sexes(More)
Cryptochromes are flavoprotein photoreceptors first identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, where they play key roles in growth and development. Subsequently identified in prokaryotes, archaea, and many eukaryotes, cryptochromes function in the animal circadian clock and are proposed as magnetoreceptors in migratory birds. Cryptochromes are closely structurally(More)
Mice lacking mCry1 and mCry2 are behaviorally arrhythmic. As shown here, cyclic expression of the clock genes mPer1 and mPer2 (mammalian Period genes 1 and 2) in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and peripheral tissues is abolished and mPer1 and mPer2 mRNA levels are constitutively high. These findings indicate that the biological clock is eliminated in the(More)
The core oscillator generating circadian rhythms in eukaryotes is composed of transcription--translation-based autoregulatory feedback loops in which clock gene products negatively affect their own expression. A key step in this mechanism involves the periodic nuclear accumulation of clock proteins following their mRNA rhythms after approximately 6 h delay.(More)
The hypothesis is advanced that the circadian pacemaker in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is composed at the molecular level of a nonredundant double complex of circadian genes (per1, cry1, and per2, cry2). Each one of these sets would be sufficient for the maintenance of endogenous rhythmicity and thus constitute an oscillator. Each would have(More)
Primary DNA damage sensing in mammalian global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) is performed by the xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC)/HR23B protein complex. HR23B and HR23A are human homologs of the yeast ubiquitin-domain repair factor RAD23, the function of which is unknown. Knockout mice revealed that mHR23A and mHR23B have a fully redundant(More)
Cryptochromes (CRYs) are composed of a core domain with structural similarity to photolyase and a distinguishing C-terminal extension. While plant and fly CRYs act as circadian photoreceptors, using the C terminus for light signaling, mammalian CRY1 and CRY2 are integral components of the circadian oscillator. However, the function of their C terminus(More)