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Many laboratories have begun to develop brain-computer interface (BCI) systems that provide communication and control capabilities to people with severe motor disabilities. Further progress and realization of practical applications depends on systematic evaluations and comparisons of different brain signals, recording methods, processing algorithms, output(More)
Signals from the brain could provide a non-muscular communication and control system, a brain-computer interface (BCI), for people who are severely paralyzed. A common BCI research strategy begins by decoding kinematic parameters from brain signals recorded during actual arm movement. It has been assumed that these parameters can be derived accurately only(More)
Over the past decade, many laboratories have begun to explore brain-computer interface (BCI) technology as a radically new communication option for those with neuromuscular impairments that prevent them from using conventional augmentative communication methods. BCI's provide these users with communication channels that do not depend on peripheral nerves(More)
A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a system that allows its users to control external devices with brain activity. Although the proof-of-concept was given decades ago, the reliable translation of user intent into device control commands is still a major challenge. Success requires the effective interaction of two adaptive controllers: the user's brain,(More)
People with severe motor disabilities can maintain an acceptable quality of life if they can communicate. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), which do not depend on muscle control, can provide communication. Four people severely disabled by ALS learned to operate a BCI with EEG rhythms recorded over sensorimotor cortex. These results suggest that a(More)
In the first large study of its kind, we quantified changes in electrocorticographic signals associated with motor movement across 22 subjects with subdural electrode arrays placed for identification of seizure foci. Patients underwent a 5-7 d monitoring period with array placement, before seizure focus resection, and during this time they participated in(More)
BACKGROUND EEG-based communication could be a valuable new augmentative communication technology for those with severe motor disabilities. Like all communication methods, it faces the problem of errors in transmission. In the Wadsworth EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI) system, subjects learn to use mu or beta rhythm amplitude to move a cursor to(More)
Brain signals can provide the basis for a non-muscular communication and control system, a brain-computer interface (BCI), for people with motor disabilities. A common approach to creating BCI devices is to decode kinematic parameters of movements using signals recorded by intracortical microelectrodes. Recent studies have shown that kinematic parameters of(More)
We show here that a brain-computer interface (BCI) using electrocorticographic activity (ECoG) and imagined or overt motor tasks enables humans to control a computer cursor in two dimensions. Over a brief training period of 12-36 min, each of five human subjects acquired substantial control of particular ECoG features recorded from several locations over(More)
Interest in developing a new method of man-to-machine communication--a brain-computer interface (BCI)--has grown steadily over the past few decades. BCIs create a new communication channel between the brain and an output device by bypassing conventional motor output pathways of nerves and muscles. These systems use signals recorded from the scalp, the(More)