• Publications
  • Influence
Mutual predation between and cannibalism within several freshwater gammarids: Dikerogammarus villosus versus one native and three invasives
TLDR
It is concluded that superiority in intraguild predation (IGP) experiments could explain the disappearance of G. pulex and the missing or limited occurrence of E. berilloni since the arrival of D. villosus in Southern German rivers.
Influence of substrate preference and complexity on co-existence of two non-native gammarideans (Crustacea: Amphipoda)
TLDR
The hypothesis that the gammarids studied here have different substrate preferences and that presence of the preferred substrate can affect predation risk is supported and differences in use of spatial niches permit co-existence of G. roeselii and D. villosus in the wild when substrates are diverse.
MOUTHPARTS OF THE PONTO-CASPIAN INVADER DIKEROGAMMARUS VILLOSUS (AMPHIPODA: PONTOGAMMARIDAE)
TLDR
Its ability to be carnivorous and to use a wide spectrum of other food may be an important reason for the success of this invader, being an advantage compared to mainly herbivorous gammarideans, which have been eliminated in many places by D. villosus.
Mouthpart Morphology of Gammarus roeselii Compared to a Successful Invader, Dikerogammarus villosus (Amphipoda)
TLDR
Test the hypothesis that different modes of food acquisition are expressed in differences in the morphology of the mouthparts and other structures involved in feeding, such as the antennae and gnathopods, possibly are indicative of the success of D. villosus over G. roeselii.
Towards autonomous vision self-calibration for soccer robots
TLDR
A method for autonomous calibration of a color classificator used for color blob-based image segmentation and landmark and object recognition is presented and the experimental results demonstrate significantly improved robustness of visual processing.
Density and temperature dependent feeding rates in an established and an alien freshwater gammarid fed on chironomid larvae
TLDR
It is concluded that both gammarid consumed a biomass in the range of 1/2 to 1/3 to their own biomass and that low predation/feeding rate at low temperature could be a reason why, in some places, indigenous gammarids can re-colonize their former habitats for a short period of time in cold winter and early spring in spite of the presence of the invasive.
Autofluorescence imaging, an excellent tool for comparative morphology
TLDR
Autofluorescence imaging is a powerful, easy and fast‐to‐apply tool for morphological studies and provides additional information for which otherwise more complex methods would have to be applied.
Imaging and Documenting Gammarideans
TLDR
Improvements of the illumination with polarized light and the possibilities of utilizing the autofluorescence of animals such as the gammarideans are discussed and software-based enhancing tools such as image fusion and image stitching are presented.
Playing Robot Soccer under Natural Light: A Case Study
TLDR
It is concluded that color-based vision has to be combined with other methods and algorithms in order to work robustly in more difficult environments with varying illumination.
Mouthpart Morphology of Three Sympatric Native and Nonnative Gammaridean Species: Gammarus pulex, G. fossarum, and Echinogammarus berilloni (Crustacea: Amphipoda)
TLDR
The hypothesis was that differences in the mode of feeding of the three species could be the reason for their coexistence and that these differences would be expressed in differences in mouthpart morphology, and the results of the SEM study demonstrate that there are indeed interspecific differences in details of the morphology of the feeding structures.
...
1
2
3
...