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Two key aspects of extreme programming (XP) are unit testing and merciless refactoring. Given the fact that the ideal test code / production code ratio approaches 1:1, it is not surprising that unit tests are being refactored. We found that refactoring test code is different from refactoring production code in two ways: (1) there is a distinct set of bad(More)
Let Tn denote the set of unrooted labeled trees of size n and let M be a particular (finite, unlabeled) tree. Assuming that every tree of Tn is equally likely, it is shown that the limiting distribution as n goes to infinity of the number of occurrences of M as an induced subtree is asymptotically normal with mean value and variance asymptotically(More)
Let Tn denote the set of unrooted unlabeled trees of size n and let M be a particular (finite) tree. Assuming that every tree of Tn is equally likely, it is shown that the number of occurrences Xn of M as an induced sub-tree satisfies E Xn ∼ µn and Var Xn ∼ σ 2 n for some (computable) constants µ > 0 and σ ≥ 0. Furthermore, if σ > 0 then (Xn − E Xn)/ √ Var(More)
Two key aspects of extreme programming XP are unit testing and merciless refactoring. Given the fact that the ideal test code production code ratio approaches 1:1, it is not surprising that unit tests are being refactored. We found that refactoring test code is diierent from refactoring production code in two w ays: 1 there is a distinct set of bad smells(More)
Various restrictions on transformational grammars have been investigated in order to reduce their generative power from recursively enumerable languages to recursive languages. It will be shown that any restriction on transformational grammars defining a recursively enumerable subset of the set of all transformational grammars, is either too weak (in the(More)
Two key aspects of extreme programming (XP) are unit testing and merciless refactoring. Given the fact that the ideal test code / production code ratio approaches 1:1, it is not surprising that unit tests are being refactored. We found that refactoring test code is diierent from refactoring production code in two ways: (1) there is a distinct set of bad(More)
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