Gerard Higgins

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Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterised by a deficit in epithelial Cl(-) secretion which in the lung leads to airway dehydration and a reduced Airway Surface Liquid (ASL) height. The endogenous lipoxin LXA(4) is a member of the newly identified eicosanoids playing a key role in ending the inflammatory process. Levels of LXA(4) are reported(More)
Bacteriophage therapy is currently resurging as a potential complement/alternative to antibiotic treatment. However, preclinical evaluation lacks streamlined approaches. We here focus on preclinical approaches which have been implemented to assess bacteriophage efficacy against Pseudomonas biofilms and infections. Laser interferometry and profilometry were(More)
In cystic fibrosis (CF), the airway surface liquid (ASL) is depleted. We previously demonstrated that lipoxin A4 (LXA4) can modulate ASL height (ASLh) through actions on Cl(-) transport. Here, we report novel effects of lipoxin on the epithelial Na(+) channel ENaC in this response. ASL dynamics and ion transport were studied using live-cell confocal(More)
Lipoxin A4 has been described as a major signal for the resolution of inflammation and is abnormally produced in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In CF, the loss of chloride transport caused by the mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel gene results in dehydration, mucus plugging, and(More)
Trapped Rydberg ions are a promising new system for quantum information processing. They have the potential to join the precise quantum operations of trapped ions and the strong, long-range interactions between Rydberg atoms. Technically, the ion trap will need to stay active while exciting the ions into the Rydberg state, else the strong Coulomb repulsion(More)
In Cystic Fibrosis (CF), mutations of the CFTR gene result in defective Cl(-) secretion and Na(+) hyperabsorption by epithelia which leads to airway lumen dehydration and mucus plugging and favours chronic bacterial colonization, persistent inflammation and progressive lung destruction. Beyond this general description, the pathogenesis of CF lung disease(More)
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