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Molecular analysis of the KAR1 gene of yeast has shown that it is required for both mitosis and conjugation. The gene was originally identified by mutations that prevent nuclear fusion. By in vitro mutagenesis and gene replacement we have demonstrated that the gene is an essential cell division cycle gene. Temperature-sensitive mutant strains show defects(More)
Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae switch from a yeast to a filamentous form. In Saccharomyces, this switch is controlled by two regulatory proteins, Ste12p and Phd1p. Single-mutant strains, ste12/ste12 or phd1/phd1, are partially defective, whereas the ste12/ste12 phd1/phd1 double mutant is completely defective in filamentous growth and is(More)
A Candida albicans gene (CPH1) was cloned that encodes a protein homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste12p, a transcription factor that is the target of the pheromone response mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade. CPH1 complements both the mating defect of ste12 haploids and the filamentous growth defect of ste12/ste12 diploids. Candida albicans(More)
Calorie restriction (CR) extends lifespan in a wide spectrum of organisms and is the only regimen known to lengthen the lifespan of mammals. We established a model of CR in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this system, lifespan can be extended by limiting glucose or by reducing the activity of the glucose-sensing cyclic-AMP-dependent kinase (PKA).(More)
Diploid S. cerevisiae strains undergo a dimorphic transition that involves changes in cell shape and the pattern of cell division and results in invasive filamentous growth in response to starvation for nitrogen. Cells become long and thin and form pseudohyphae that grow away from the colony and invade the agar medium. Pseudohyphal growth allows yeast cells(More)
Monoclonal antibodies generated against a family of related nuclear pore complex proteins (nucleoporins) from rat liver nuclei cross-react with several proteins in the yeast S. cerevisiae and show punctate nuclear envelope staining similar to the pattern seen in mammalian cells. We have cloned a gene encoding one of these proteins (NUP1) and have confirmed(More)
Microarray-based gene expression analysis identified genes showing ploidy-dependent expression in isogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that varied in ploidy from haploid to tetraploid. These genes were induced or repressed in proportion to the number of chromosome sets, regardless of the mating type. Ploidy-dependent repression of some G1 cyclins can(More)
Zygote formation occurs through tightly coordinated cell and nuclear fusion events. Genetic evidence suggests that the FUS2 gene product promotes cell fusion during zygote formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, functioning with the Fus1 plasma membrane protein at or before cell wall and plasma membrane fusion. Here we report the sequence of the FUS2 gene,(More)
In yeast, an overlapping set of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components controls mating, haploid invasion, and pseudohyphal development. Paradoxically, a single downstream transcription factor, Ste12, is necessary for the execution of these distinct programs. Developmental specificity was found to require a transcription factor of the(More)