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The Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia is introduced. This is a 19-item clinician-administered instrument that uses information from interviews with both the patient and a nursing staff member, a method suitable for demented patients. The scale has high interrater reliability (kw = 0.67), internal consistency (coefficient alpha: 0.84), and(More)
We propose that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. The "vascular depression" hypothesis is supported by the comorbidity of depression, vascular disease, and vascular risk factors and the association of ischemic lesions to distinctive behavioral symptoms. Disruption of prefrontal systems or(More)
CONTEXT Suicide rates are highest in late life; the majority of older adults who die by suicide have seen a primary care physician in preceding months. Depression is the strongest risk factor for late-life suicide and for suicide's precursor, suicidal ideation. OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of a primary care intervention on suicidal ideation and(More)
In elderly people, depression mainly affects those with chronic medical illnesses and cognitive impairment, causes suffering, family disruption, and disability, worsens the outcomes of many medical illnesses, and increases mortality. Ageing-related and disease-related processes, including arteriosclerosis and inflammatory, endocrine, and immune changes(More)
BACKGROUND Cerebral aging is a complex and heterogeneous process that is associated with a high degree of inter-individual variability. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to identify and quantify non-disease-related aging of the cerebral white matter. METHODS The present article reviews the findings from several MRI techniques,(More)
OBJECTIVE The authors' goal was to examine the clinical presentation of a group of depressed elderly patients with clinically defined risk factors for vascular depression compared with a group of elderly depressed patients without such risk factors. METHOD Cognitive deficits, disability, and depressive symptoms were examined in 33 consecutively recruited(More)
It is anticipated that the number of people older than 65 years with psychiatric disorders in the United States will increase from about 4 million in 1970 to15 million in 2030. The current health care system serves mentally ill older adults poorly and is unprepared to meet the upcoming crisis in geriatric mental health. We recommend the formulation of a 15-(More)
OBJECTIVES Concerns about the safety of benzodiazepines in older adults may have led investigators and clinicians to underestimate the importance of adequately treating generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in later life. To evaluate the safety and efficacy profile of an alternative treatment in older patients, we conducted a secondary analysis of five(More)
OBJECTIVE Major depression is undertreated despite the availability of effective treatments. Psychological barriers to treatment, such as perceived stigma and minimization of the need for care, may be important obstacles to adherence to the pharmacologic treatment of major depression. The authors examined the impact of barriers that were present at the(More)
It has been proposed that a "depression-executive dysfunction (DED) syndrome" occurs in late life. This assertion was based on clinical, neuropathological, and neuroimaging findings suggesting that frontostriatal dysfunctions contribute to the development of both depression and executive dysfunction and influence the course of depression. The authors(More)