Garth A. Nicholson

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Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disorder characterized pathologically by ubiquitinated TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) inclusions. The function of TDP-43 in the nervous system is uncertain, and a mechanistic role in neurodegeneration remains speculative. We identified neighboring mutations in a highly conserved region of TARDBP(More)
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that is familial in 10% of cases. We have identified a missense mutation in the gene encoding fused in sarcoma (FUS) in a British kindred, linked to ALS6. In a survey of 197 familial ALS index cases, we identified two further missense mutations in eight families. Postmortem analysis of(More)
Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) is a rare autosomal dominant form of juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) characterized by distal muscle weakness and atrophy, normal sensation, and pyramidal signs. Individuals affected with ALS4 usually have an onset of symptoms at age <25 years, a slow rate of progression, and a normal life span. The(More)
Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies. Different chromosomal loci have been linked with three autosomal dominant, 'intermediate' types of CMT: DI-CMTA, DI-CMTB and DI-CMTC. We refined the locus associated with DI-CMTB on chromosome 19p12-13.2 to 4.2 Mb in three unrelated families(More)
Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN1) is the most common hereditary disorder of peripheral sensory neurons. HSN1 is an autosomal dominant progressive degeneration of dorsal root ganglia and motor neurons with onset in the second or third decades. Initial symptoms are sensory loss in the feet followed by distal muscle wasting and weakness. Loss of pain(More)
We describe an Australian family of Greek origin with a parkinsonian syndrome and an Ala53Thr alpha-synuclein gene mutation. Five of 9 siblings were affected, the average age of onset was 45 years, and the initial symptoms were variable, including resting tremor, bradykinesia, and gait disturbance, as previously described in families with the same point(More)
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating and universally fatal neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in two related RNA-binding proteins, TDP-43 and FUS, that harbor prion-like domains, cause some forms of ALS. There are at least 213 human proteins harboring RNA recognition motifs, including FUS and TDP-43, raising the possibility that additional(More)
DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is crucial for maintenance of methylation, gene regulation and chromatin stability. DNA mismatch repair, cell cycle regulation in post-mitotic neurons and neurogenesis are influenced by DNA methylation. Here we show that mutations in DNMT1 cause both central and peripheral neurodegeneration in one form of hereditary sensory(More)
OBJECTIVE FUS gene mutations were recently identified in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The present studies sought to define the clinical, post-mortem and neurophysiological phenotypes in ALS families with FUS mutations and to determine the frequency of FUS mutations in familial and sporadic ALS. METHODS FUS was screened for mutations in(More)
BACKGROUND Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) represents a clinically, pathologically and genetically heterogenous neurodegenerative disorder, often complicated by neurological signs such as motor neuron-related limb weakness, spasticity and paralysis, parkinsonism and gait disturbances. Linkage to chromosome 9p had been reported for pedigrees with(More)