Gareth S. Owen

Matthew Hotopf6
George Szmukler4
Genevra Richardson3
6Matthew Hotopf
4George Szmukler
3Genevra Richardson
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BACKGROUND Is the nature of decision-making capacity (DMC) for treatment significantly different in medical and psychiatric patients? AIMS To compare the abilities relevant to DMC for treatment in medical and psychiatric patients who are able to communicate a treatment choice. METHOD A secondary analysis of two cross-sectional studies of consecutive(More)
We tested a phenomenological hypothesis about theoretical and practical rationality in people with schizophrenia. This hypothesis states that in schizophrenia there is an enhancement of theoretical rationality. Our case-control experiment supported this hypothesis. Philosophical models of rationality that prioritise theoretical over practical rationality(More)
BACKGROUND Psychiatric disorders can pose problems in the assessment of decision-making capacity (DMC). This is so particularly where psychopathology is seen as the extreme end of a dimension that includes normality. Depression is an example of such a psychiatric disorder. Four abilities (understanding, appreciating, reasoning and ability to express a(More)
BACKGROUND In England and Wales mental health services need to take account of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the Mental Health Act 1983. The overlap between these two causes dilemmas for clinicians. AIMS To describe the frequency and characteristics of patients who fall into two potentially anomalous groups: those who are not detained but lack mental(More)
BACKGROUND An individual's right to self-determination in treatment decisions is a central principle of modern medical ethics and law, and is upheld except under conditions of mental incapacity. When doctors, particularly psychiatrists, override the treatment wishes of individuals, they risk conflicting with this principle. Few data are available on the(More)
For people with Bipolar Affective Disorder, a self-binding (advance) directive (SBD), by which they commit themselves to treatment during future episodes of mania, even if unwilling, can seem the most rational way to deal with an imperfect predicament. Knowing that mania will almost certainly cause enormous damage to themselves, their preferred solution may(More)
BACKGROUND The Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) was introduced in 2007 to protect vulnerable individuals who lack capacity to make decisions for themselves and to provide a legal framework for professionals to assess incapacity. The impact of the MCA on clinical practice is not known. This study aims to evaluate how frequently mental capacity is assessed in(More)
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