Gabriele Gillessen-Kaesbach

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Cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome is characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, heart defects and mental retardation. It phenotypically overlaps with Noonan and Costello syndrome, which are caused by mutations in PTPN11 and HRAS, respectively. In 43 individuals with CFC, we identified two heterozygous KRAS mutations in three individuals and eight(More)
Tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome (TRPS) is characterized by craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. Three subtypes have been described: TRPS I, caused by mutations in the TRPS1 gene on chromosome 8; TRPS II, a microdeletion syndrome affecting the TRPS1 and EXT1 genes; and TRPS III, a form with severe brachydactyly, due to short metacarpals, and severe(More)
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a dominantly inherited congenital malformation disorder, caused by mutations in the cohesin-loading protein NIPBL for nearly 60% of individuals with classical CdLS, and by mutations in the core cohesin components SMC1A (~5%) and SMC3 (<1%) for a smaller fraction of probands. In humans, the multisubunit complex cohesin is(More)
Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a common, severe malformation of the brain that involves separation of the central nervous system into left and right halves. Mild HPE can consist of signs such as a single central incisor, hypotelorism, microcephaly, or other craniofacial findings that can be present with or without associated brain malformations. The aetiology(More)
The D15S9 and D15S63 loci in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region on chromosome 15 are subject to parent-of-origin-specific DNA methylation. We have found two Prader-Willi syndrome families in which the patients carry a maternal methylation imprint on the paternal chromosome. In one of these families, the patients have a small deletion encompassing the(More)
Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is an autosomal dominant human disorder of bone formation that causes developmental skeletal defects and extensive debilitating bone formation within soft connective tissues (heterotopic ossification) during childhood. All patients with classic clinical features of FOP (great toe malformations and progressive(More)
Intrauterine growth retardation is caused by maternal, fetal or placental factors that result in impaired endovascular trophoblast invasion and reduced placental perfusion. Although various causes of intrauterine growth retardation have been identified, most cases remain unexplained. Studying 29 families with 3-M syndrome (OMIM 273750), an autosomal(More)
The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and the Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct genetic disorders that are caused by a deletion of chromosome region 15q11-13 or by uniparental disomy for chromosome 15. Whereas PWS results from the absence of a paternal copy of 15q11-13, the absence of a maternal copy of 15q11-13 leads to AS. We have found that an MspI/HpaII(More)
Arterial tortuosity syndrome (ATS) is a rare autosomal recessive connective tissue disease, characterized by widespread arterial involvement with elongation, tortuosity, and aneurysms of the large and middle-sized arteries. Recently, SLC2A10 mutations were identified in this condition. This gene encodes the glucose transporter GLUT10 and was previously(More)
We observed two unrelated consanguineous families with malformation syndromes sharing anophthalmia and distinct eyebrows as common signs, but differing for alveolar capillary dysplasia or complex congenital heart defect in one and diaphragmatic hernia in the other family. Homozygosity mapping revealed linkage to a common locus on chromosome 15, and(More)