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We present a theory for disordered interacting electrons that can describe both the Mott and Anderson transitions in the respective limits of zero disorder and zero interaction. We use it to investigate the T ෇ 0 Mott-Anderson transition at a fixed electron density, as the disorder strength is increased. Surprisingly, we find two critical values of disorder(More)
We use the coupled two-dimensional spin–three-dimensional fermion model proposed by Rosch et al. ͓Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 159 ͑1997͔͒ to study the thermoelectric behavior of a heavy-fermion compound when it is close to an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point. When the low-energy spin fluctuations are quasi-two-dimensional, as has been observed in YbRh 2 Si(More)
A slave-boson representation for the degenerate Hubbard model is introduced. The location of the metal-to-insulator transition that occurs at commensurate densities is shown to depend weakly on the band degen-eracy M. The relative weights of the Hubbard subbands depend strongly on M , as well as the magnetic properties. It is also shown that a sizable(More)
Given the practical importance of metallic plutonium, there is considerable interest in understanding its fundamental properties. Plutonium undergoes a 25 per cent increase in volume when transformed from its alpha-phase (which is stable below 400 K) to the delta-phase (stable at around 600 K), an effect that is crucial for issues of long-term storage and(More)
The zero-temperature magnetoconductivity of just-metallic Si:P scales with magnetic field H and dopant concentration n lying on a single universal curve: ␴(n,H)/␴(n,0)ϭG͓H Ϫ␦ ⌬n͔ with a magnetic-field cross-over exponent ␦Ϸ2. We note that Si:P, Si:B, and Si:As all have unusually large crossover exponents near 2, and suggest that this anomalously weak(More)
Although the nuclear properties of the late actinides (plutonium, americium and curium) are fully understood and widely applied to energy generation, their solid-state properties do not fit within standard models and are the subject of active research. Plutonium displays phases with enormous volume differences, and both its Pauli-like magnetic(More)
The iron pnictide and chalcogenide compounds are a subject of intensive investigations owing to their surprisingly high temperature superconductivity. They all share the same basic building blocks, but there is significant variation in their physical properties, such as magnetic ordered moments, effective masses, superconducting gaps and transition(More)