• Publications
  • Influence
Growth processes in teeth distinguish modern humans from Homo erectus and earlier hominins
TLDR
Differences in enamel growth are reported that show the earliest fossils attributed to Homo do not resemble modern humans in their development, and it seems likely that truly modern dental development emerged relatively late in human evolution.
A histological reconstruction of dental development in the common chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes.
TLDR
It seems that chimpanzee teeth have a greatly reduced time for root growth before emergence occurs and that the major differences between Homo sapiens and Pan lie in the first part of the root formation rather than in the total period of crown formation.
Taxonomic and functional aspects of the patterning of enamel thickness distribution in extant large-bodied hominoids.
  • G. Schwartz
  • Environmental Science
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1 February 2000
One of the few uncontested viewpoints in studies of enamel thickness is that the molars of the African apes, Pan and Gorilla, possess "thin" enamel, while Pongo and modern humans possess varying
Developmental Aspects of Sexual Dimorphism in Hominoid Canines
TLDR
The histology of canine teeth in extant hominoids and provided a comparative database on several aspects of canine development indicate that sexual differences in canine development are most apparent in the earlier stages of canine crown formation.
Foot bones from Omo: implications for hominid evolution.
  • D. Gebo, G. Schwartz
  • Geography, Environmental Science
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1 April 2006
TLDR
Although the Omo tarsals are a million years younger than the oldest known foot bones from Hadar, both localities demonstrate anatomical differences representing two distinct morphological patterns, suggesting that biomechanical changes did occur over time, and that certain features are associated with different hominid lineages.
Sexual dimorphism in modern human permanent teeth.
TLDR
It is shown that sexual dimorphism is likely due, in part, to the presence of relatively more dentine in the crowns of male teeth, and that weights of canines may be more useful as a means of sexing modern human skeletal material than linear or area measurements of teeth.
Ontogeny of canine dimorphism in extant hominoids.
  • G. Schwartz, C. Dean
  • Biology, Environmental Science
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1 July 2001
TLDR
The developmental process(es) regulating canine dimorphism in extant hominoids is described, using histological markers of tooth growth, to reconstruct longitudinal growth curves for height attainment in male and female hominoid canines.
Dental development and life history in living African and Asian apes
  • J. Kelley, G. Schwartz
  • Environmental Science
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 28 December 2009
Life-history inference is an important aim of paleoprimatology, but life histories cannot be discerned directly from the fossil record. Among extant primates, the timing of many life-history
A fine line: a comparison of methods for estimating ages of linear enamel hypoplasia formation.
TLDR
Compared estimated ages of LEH formation produced by two of the most commonly used macroscopic methods to those derived from data in recent histological studies that include more precise information about the timing of crown formation across diverse human populations suggest that reevaluation of the methods used to estimate ages may be justified.
...
...