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Invasion of Coastal Marine Communities in North America: Apparent Patterns, Processes, and Biases
TLDR
Overall, the emergent patterns reflect interactive effects of propagule supply, invasion resistance, and sampling bias, and the relative contribution of each component re... Expand
Global Invasions of Marine and Estuarine Habitats by Non-Indigenous Species: Mechanisms, Extent, and Consequences'
TLDR
It is clear that non-indigenous species are a significant force of change in marine and especially estuarine communities globally and studies of marine communities that do not include NIS are increasingly incomplete. Expand
Distinguishing between terrestrial and autochthonous organic matter sources in marine environments using fluorescence spectroscopy
Abstract The optical properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are frequently used as tracers of water masses in bays and estuaries but present unique challenges in the ocean due toExpand
Non-indigenous species as stressors in estuarine and marine communities: Assessing invasion impacts and interactions
Invasions by non-indigenous species (NIS) are recognized as important stressors of many communities throughout the world. Here, we evaluated available data on the role of NIS in marine and estuarineExpand
Predicting the impact of introduced marine species: Lessons from the multiple invasions of the European green crab Carcinus maenas
TLDR
It is suggested that the degree of similarity of these characteristics across invasions provides a valuable measure of how predictable they will be in future invasions. Expand
The colonial ascidian Didemnum sp. A: Current distribution, basic biology and potential threat to marine communities of the northeast and west coasts of North America
Abstract Didemnum sp. A is a colonial ascidian with rapidly expanding populations on the east and west coasts of North America. The origin of Didemum sp. A is unknown. Populations were first observedExpand
Global spread of microorganisms by ships
TLDR
It is shown that the global movement of ballast water by ships creates a long-distance dispersal mechanism for human pathogens and may be important in the worldwide distribution of microorganisms, as well as for the epidemiology of waterborne diseases affecting plants and animals. Expand
BIOTIC RESISTANCE TO INVASION: NATIVE PREDATOR LIMITS ABUNDANCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF AN INTRODUCED CRAB
TLDR
The hypothesis that the native predator Callinectes sapidus provides biotic resistance to invasion and prevents the southward spread and establishment of Carcinus maenas is supported. Expand
THE IMPACTS OF A NONINDIGENOUS MARINE PREDATOR IN A CALIFORNIA BAY
TLDR
The impact of the nonindigenous green crab, Carcinus maenas, on a coastal marine food web in central California is measured and it is found that this predator exerted strong “top-down” control, significantly reducing the abundances of several of the 20 invertebrate species monitored over a 9-yr period. Expand
Evidence of self-recruitment in demersal marine populations
TLDR
The mounting evidence in support of self-recruitment dynamics indicates a pressing need for a reevaluation of the appropriateness of demographically-open population models and their applicability to the management and conservation of marine ecosystems. Expand
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