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Guidelines for the Care and Welfare of Cephalopods in Research –A consensus based on an initiative by CephRes, FELASA and the Boyd Group
TLDR
This paper is the result of an international initiative and is a first attempt to develop guidelines for the care and welfare of cephalopods following the inclusion of this Class of ∼700 known living invertebrate species in Directive 2010/63/EU. Expand
Observational Learning in Octopus vulgaris
TLDR
Untrained Octopus vulgaris (observers) were allowed to watch conditioned Octopus(demonstrators) perform the task of selecting one of two objects that were presented simultaneously and differed only in color to show that observational learning can occur in invertebrates. Expand
Control of Octopus Arm Extension by a Peripheral Motor Program
TLDR
It is shown that arm extensions can be evoked mechanically or electrically in arms whose connection with the brain has been severed, suggesting that the basic motor program for voluntary movement is embedded within the neural circuitry of the arm itself. Expand
Cephalopods in neuroscience: regulations, research and the 3Rs
TLDR
The approaches being taken by the cephalopod research community to produce “guidelines” are described and the potential contribution of neuroscience research to cepHalopod welfare is described. Expand
Organization of Octopus Arm Movements: A Model System for Studying the Control of Flexible Arms
TLDR
It is proposed that this strategy reduces the immense redundancy of the octopus arm movements and hence simplifies motor control. Expand
The Octopus: A Model for a Comparative Analysis of the Evolution of Learning and Memory Mechanisms
TLDR
The emerging results suggest that a convergent evolutionary process has led to the selection of vertebrate-like neural organization and activity-dependent long-term synaptic plasticity in octopuses and vertebrates, and suggests the importance of the shared properties for the mediation of learning and memory. Expand
Neurobiology: Motor control of flexible octopus arms
TLDR
It is shown that when the octopus uses one of its long and highly flexible arms to transfer an object from one place to another, it employs a vertebrate-like strategy, temporarily reconfiguring its arm into a stiffened, articulated, quasi-jointed structure, indicating that an articulated limb may provide an optimal solution for achieving precise, point-to-point movements. Expand
Evaluating age in Octopus vulgaris: estimation, validation and seasonal differences
TLDR
The results demonstrate that growth increments in the upper beak of O. vulgaris provide a reliable method of aging that can be applied to assessing differences in the growth patterns in wild populations, and one that provides a record of environmental influences upon an individual. Expand
Patterns of Arm Muscle Activation Involved in Octopus Reaching Movements
TLDR
The results suggest that feed-forward motor commands play an important role in the control of movement velocity and that simple adjustment of the excitation levels at the initial stages of the movement can set the velocity profile of the whole movement. Expand
Octopuses Use a Human-like Strategy to Control Precise Point-to-Point Arm Movements
TLDR
A peripheral neural mechanism-two waves of muscle activation propagate toward each other, and their collision point sets the medial-joint location, which is a remarkably simple mechanism for adjusting the length of the segments according to where the object is grasped. Expand
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