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A palaeontological solution to the arthropod head problem
  • G. Budd
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Nature
  • 16 May 2002
The composition of the arthropod head has been one of the most controversial topics in zoology, with a large number of theories being proposed to account for it over the last century. AlthoughExpand
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A critical reappraisal of the fossil record of the bilaterian phyla
  • G. Budd, S. Jensen
  • Medicine
  • Biological reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical…
  • 1 May 2000
It has long been assumed that the extant bilaterian phyla generally have their origin in the Cambrian explosion, when they appear in an essentially modern form. Both these assumptions areExpand
  • 281
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Tardigrades as ‘Stem-Group Arthropods’: The Evidence from the Cambrian Fauna
Abstract The Cambrian fauna can now reasonably be seen as containing many taxa that lie in the stem-groups of the extant phyla. As such, these fossils suggest how both the ‘body plans’ of extantExpand
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Conservation, loss, and redeployment of Wnt ligands in protostomes: implications for understanding the evolution of segment formation
BackgroundThe Wnt genes encode secreted glycoprotein ligands that regulate a wide range of developmental processes, including axis elongation and segmentation. There are thirteen subfamilies of WntExpand
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Head development in the onychophoran Euperipatoides kanangrensis with particular reference to the central nervous system
The neuroectoderm of the Euperipatoides kanangrensis embryo becomes distinguishable during germ band formation when the antennal segment is evident externally. During later stages of development, theExpand
  • 109
  • 12
The morphology of Opabinia regalis and the reconstruction of the arthropod stem‐group
Opabinia regalis Walcott is an enigmatic fossil from the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale of uncertain affinities. Recent suggestions place it in a clade with Anomalocaris Whiteaves from the BurgessExpand
  • 132
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The Burgess Shale Anomalocaridid Hurdia and Its Significance for Early Euarthropod Evolution
As the largest predators of the Cambrian seas, the anomalocaridids had an important impact in structuring the first complex marine animal communities, but many aspects of anomalocaridid morphology,Expand
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The earliest fossil record of the animals and its significance
  • G. Budd
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B…
  • 27 April 2008
The fossil record of the earliest animals has been enlivened in recent years by a series of spectacular discoveries, including embryos, from the Ediacaran to the Cambrian, but many issues, not leastExpand
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  • 12
  • PDF
Onychophoran cephalic nerves and their bearing on our understanding of head segmentation and stem-group evolution of Arthropoda.
The extant Onychophora are basal representatives of the Arthropoda, resembling Cambrian arthropod stem-group fossils such as Aysheaia and other so-called lobopodians. They thus provide an importantExpand
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  • 11
The origin and evolution of arthropods
The past two decades have witnessed profound changes in our understanding of the evolution of arthropods. Many of these insights derive from the adoption of molecular methods by systematists andExpand
  • 153
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