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Quantum cryptography: Public key distribution and coin tossing
TLDR
A protocol for coin-tossing by exchange of quantum messages is presented, which is secure against traditional kinds of cheating, even by an opponent with unlimited computing power, but ironically can be subverted by use of a still subtler quantum phenomenon, the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox. Expand
Tight bounds on quantum searching
TLDR
A lower bound on the efficiency of any possible quantum database searching algorithm is provided and it is shown that Grover''s algorithm nearly comes within a factor 2 of being optimal in terms of the number of probes required in the table. Expand
Quantum Amplitude Amplification and Estimation
Consider a Boolean function $\chi: X \to \{0,1\}$ that partitions set $X$ between its good and bad elements, where $x$ is good if $\chi(x)=1$ and bad otherwise. Consider also a quantum algorithmExpand
Experimental Quantum Cryptography
TLDR
Initial results from an apparatus and protocol designed to implement quantum public key distribution are described, by which two users exchange a random quantum transmission, consisting of very faint flashes of polarized light, which remains secure against an adversary with unlimited computing power. Expand
Secret-Key Reconciliation by Public Discussion
TLDR
A more efficient protocol is presented, which leaks an amount of information acceptably close to the minimum possible for sufficiently reliable secret channels (those with probability of any symbol being transmitted incorrectly as large as 15%). Expand
Strengths and Weaknesses of Quantum Computing
TLDR
It is proved that relative to an oracle chosen uniformly at random with probability 1 the class $\NP$ cannot be solved on a quantum Turing machine (QTM) in time $o(2^{n/2})$. Expand
Generalized privacy amplification
This paper provides a general treatment of privacy amplification by public discussion, a concept introduced by Bennett, Brassard and Robert (1988) for a special scenario. The results haveExpand
Minimum Disclosure Proofs of Knowledge
TLDR
This paper unifies and extends models and techniques previously put forward by the authors, and compares some independent related work. Expand
Generalized privacy amplification
TLDR
This paper provides a general treatment of privacy amplification by public discussion, a concept introduced by Bennett, Brassard, and Robert for a special scenario, and yields results on wiretap and broadcast channels for a considerably strengthened definition of secrecy capacity. Expand
Privacy Amplification by Public Discussion
In this paper, we investigate how the use of a channel with perfect authenticity but no privacy can be used to repair the defects of a channel with imperfect privacy but no authenticity. More preci...
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