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REGOLITH AND MEGAREGOLITH FORMATION OF H-CHONDRITES : THERMAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE PARENT BODY
Abstract Spectral reflectivity data and its location near an orbital resonance suggest that Asteroid 6 Hebe may be the source body for H-chondrites, the second largest meteorite group. RecentExpand
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Thermoluminescence sensitivity and thermal history of type 3 ordinary chondrites: Eleven new type 3.0–3.1 chondrites and possible explanations for differences among H, L, and LL chondrites
We review induced thermoluminescence (TL) data for 102 unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs), many data just published in abstracts, in order to identify particularly primitive UOCs and furtherExpand
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Historical and Chemical Traces of an Ozark Cemetery for Enslaved African-Americans: A Study of Silhouette Burials in Benton County, Arkansas
The identification of human graves in situations where there is little or no evidence of skeletal material or coffins has been a problem for archaeologists. In the spring of 1998, the ArkansasExpand
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Metal‐silicate fractionation in the surface dust layers of accreting planetesimals: Implications for the formation of ordinary chondrites and the nature of asteroid surfaces
Some of the most primitive solar system materials available for study in the laboratory are the ordinary chondrites, the largest meteorite class. The size and distribution of the chondrules (silicateExpand
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CHONDRULE AND METAL SIZE-SORTING IN ASTEROIDAL REGOLITHS: EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR CHONDRITIC METEORITES
Chondritic meteorites have unique chondrule and metal abundances and sizes. This metal-silicate fractionation has been generally attributed to localized processes occurring in the solar nebula priorExpand
Size Sorting of Metal, Sulfide, and Chondrules in Sharps (H3.4)
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Thermal History of 6 Hebe as the H-Chondrite Parent Body
We have modeled the thermal history of asteroid 6 Hebe using a finite difference approximation for the radial heat conduction equation. Unlike previous work our computer code accounts forExpand
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