G P Schooneveldt

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In experiment I, thresholds for 400-ms sinusoidal signals were measured in the presence of a continuous 25-Hz-wide noise centered at signal frequencies (fs) ranging from 250 to 8000 Hz in 1-oct steps. The masker was presented either alone or together with a second continuous 25-Hz-wide band of noise (the flanking band) whose envelope was either correlated(More)
These experiments on across-channel masking (ACM) and comodulation masking release (CMR) were designed to extend the work of Grose and Hall [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 85, 1276-1284 (1989)] on CMR. They investigated the effect of the temporal position of a brief 700-Hz signal relative to the modulation cycle of a 700-Hz masker 100% sinusoidally amplitude modulated(More)
These experiments examine how comodulation masking release (CMR) varies with masker bandwidth, modulator bandwidth, and signal duration. In experiment 1, thresholds were measured for a 400-ms, 2000-Hz signal masked by continuous noise varying in bandwidth from 50-3200 Hz in 1-oct steps. In one condition, using random noise maskers, thresholds increased with(More)
The modulation depth required for the detection of sinusoidal amplitude modulation was measured as a function of modulation rate, giving temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs). The carrier was a one-octave wide noise centred at 2 kHz, and it was presented in an unmodulated background noise lowpass filtered at 5 kHz. Three subjects with unilateral(More)
Three subjects with unilateral cochlear hearing loss and three subjects with bilateral cochlear hearing loss were tested in three experiments. In the first, their auditory filter shapes were measured for center frequencies of 700 and 2000 Hz, using the notched-noise method. The auditory filters were generally broader for the impaired than for the normal(More)
The threshold for a signal masked by a narrow band of noise centered at the signal frequency (the on-frequency band) may be reduced by adding to the masker a second band of noise (the flanking band) whose envelope is correlated with that of the first band. This effect is called comodulation masking release (CMR). These experiments examine two questions. (1)(More)
Thresholds were measured for detecting a signal centered in a narrow-band noise (NBN) masker (on-frequency band, OFB), for the OFB alone, and with two flanking bands (FBs) added to the OFB, one centered above and one below the OFB. The FBs were either correlated with the OFB or were independent and were presented either to the same ear as the signal plus(More)
This paper examines some of the factors that can affect the magnitude of comodulation masking release (CMR). In experiment I, psychometric functions were measured for the detection of a 1-kHz sinusoidal signal in a "multiplied" narrow-band noise centered at 1 kHz (reference condition) and the same noise with two comodulated flanking bands added. The(More)
PURPOSE The aim of this study is to develop and validate a generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), independent of gender and treatment position (prone or supine), using only pretreatment imaging data. METHODS Data of 20 patients, treated for tumors in the pelvic region with the entire bladder visible on(More)
The threshold for a signal masked by a narrow band of noise centered at the signal frequency (the on-frequency band) may be reduced by adding to the masker a second band of noise (the flanking band) whose envelope is correlated with that of the first band, an effect called comodulation masking release (CMR). This paper examines CMR as a function of masker(More)