Learn More
Several animal models of vestibular deficits that mimic the human pathology phenotype have previously been developed to correlate the degree of vestibular injury to cognate vestibular deficits in a time-dependent manner. Sodium arsanilate is one of the most commonly used substances for chemical vestibular lesioning, but it is not well described in the(More)
It has recently been shown that a lack of vestibular sensory information decreases spatial memory performance and induces biochemical changes in the hippocampus in rodents. After vestibular neurectomy, patients display spatial memory deficit and hippocampal atrophy. Our objectives were to explore: (a) spatial (Y maze, radial-arm maze), and non-spatial(More)
Bone remodeling allows the conservation of normal bone mass despite constant changes in internal and external environments. The adaptation of the skeleton to these various stimuli leads credence to the notion that bone remodeling is a true homeostatic function, and as such is under the control of specific centers in the central nervous system (CNS).(More)
The inner ear vestibular system has numerous projections on central brain centers that regulate sympathetic outflow, and skeletal sympathetic projections affect bone remodeling by inhibiting bone formation by osteoblasts and promoting bone resorption by osteoclasts. In this study, we show that bilateral vestibular lesions in mice cause a low bone mass(More)
We previously showed that bilateral vestibular lesion in rats induces a bone loss in weight bearing bones. To determine whether this effect is mediated by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in 4 groups of 10 female Wistar rats: bilateral labyrinthectomy (Bilab), Bilab with propranolol treatment, sham operated with(More)
The vestibular system is a small bilateral structure located in the inner ear, known as the organ of balance and spatial orientation. It senses head orientation and motion, as well as body motion in the three dimensions of our environment. It is also involved in non-motor functions such as postural control of blood pressure. These regulations are mediated(More)
Individuals with neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1) can manifest focal skeletal dysplasias that remain extremely difficult to treat. NF1 is caused by mutations in the NF1 gene, which encodes the RAS GTPase-activating protein neurofibromin. We report here that ablation of Nf1 in bone-forming cells leads to supraphysiologic accumulation of pyrophosphate (PPi), a(More)
Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disease with an incidence of 1/3000, caused by mutations in the NF1 gene, which encodes the RAS/GTPase-activating protein neurofibromin. Non-bone union after fracture (pseudarthrosis) in children with NF1 remains a challenging orthopedic condition to treat. Recent progress in understanding the biology(More)
Destruction of the inner ear in rats for medical research has been performed since 1936. Nevertheless, descriptions of the technique used and clinical analysis are poor and often involve coagulation of the stapedial artery. We suggest a description of a surgical ventrolateral approach to labyrinthectomy in rats, with preservation of the stapedial artery.(More)
  • 1