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Consumers’ budgets are influenced by the temporal frame used for the budget period. Budgets planned for the next month are much lower than recorded expenses, while those for the next year are closer to recorded expenses (study 1). The difficulty of estimating budgets for the next year imparts low confidence and leads to upward adjustment. When consumers’(More)
We argue that people intuitively distinguish epistemic (knowable) uncertainty from aleatory (random) uncertainty and show that the relative salience of these dimensions is reflected in natural language use. We hypothesize that confidence statements (e.g., “I am fairly confident,” “I am 90% sure,” “I am reasonably certain”) communicate a subjective(More)
Different framing of the same duration (one year, 12 months, 365 days) can influence consumers' impressions of subjective duration, thereby affecting their judgments and decisions. The authors propose that, ironically, self-relevance amplifies this duration framing effect. Consumers for whom a particular self-improvement domain is personally relevant are(More)
Whereas prior literature has studied the positive effects of curiosity-evoking events that are integral to focal activities, we explore whether and how a curiosity-evoking event that is incidental to a focal activity induces negative outcomes for enjoyment. Four experiments and 1 field study demonstrate that curiosity about an event that is incidental to an(More)
We argue that people intuitively distinguish epistemic (knowable) uncertainty from aleatory (random) uncertainty and show that the relative salience of these dimensions is reflected in natural language use. We hypothesize that confidence statements (e.g., “I am fairly confident,” “I am 90% sure,” “I am reasonably certain”) communicate a subjective(More)
Explicit suggestions by retailers or implicit contextual factors can highlight either similarities or differences in product comparisons. In five laboratory studies, the authors demonstrate that these highlighted comparison frames do not single-handedly dictate consumer’s attention to similarities versus differences. The authors identify a key factor,(More)
People view uncertain events as either knowable in principle (epistemic uncertainty), as fundamentally random (aleatory uncertainty), or as some mixture of the two. We show that people make more extreme probability judgments (i.e., closer to 0 or 1) for events they view as entailing more epistemic uncertainty and less aleatory uncertainty. We demonstrate(More)
David Tannenbaum,a Craig R. Fox,b Gülden Ülkümen c aDavid Eccles School of Business, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112; bAnderson School of Management, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024; cMarshall School of Business, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 Contact:(More)