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Four-winged dinosaurs from China
TLDR
New evidence is provided suggesting that basal dromaeosaurid dinosaurs were four-winged animals and probably could glide, representing an intermediate stage towards the active, flapping-flight stage of proavians.
Insight into diversity, body size and morphological evolution from the largest Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird
TLDR
The largest Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird from north‐east China is reported, which provides evidence that basal members of Enantiornithes share more morphologies with ornithurine birds than previously recognized, and allows a re‐evaluation of a previously proposed hypothesis of competitive exclusion among EarlyCretaceous avian clades.
Anatomy of the primitive bird Sapeornis chaoyangensis from the Early Cretaceous of Liaoning, China
Two new, nearly completely articulated skeletons of Sapeornis chaoyangensis provide much new information about the anatomy of this basal avian, particularly in the skull, pectoral girdle, forelimb,
Insight into the evolution of avian flight from a new clade of Early Cretaceous ornithurines from China and the morphology of Yixianornis grabaui
TLDR
The complete articulated holotype specimen of Yixianornis grabaui, from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation of Liaoning Province, in north‐eastern China, arguably the best‐preserved basal ornithurine specimen yet discovered, provides the earliest evidence consistent with the presence of extant avian tail feather fanning.
Further support for a Cretaceous age for the feathered-dinosaur beds of Liaoning,China:New 40Ar÷39Ar dating of the Yixian and Tuchengzi Formations
We report new 40Ar÷39Ar dating results obtained from total fusion and incremental-heating analyses of sanidine and biotite from three tuffs found interbedded within the fossil-bearing deposits of
Jeholornis compared to Archaeopteryx, with a new understanding of the earliest avian evolution
TLDR
The recently reported Jeholornis represents the only known bird with a complete long skeletal tail except for Archaeopteryx, and it is concluded that the common ancestor of birds must have a more primitive tail than that in Archaeoporationx, confirming the side branch position of Archaeoperyx in the early avian evolution.
A beaked basal ornithurine bird (Aves, Ornithurae) from the Lower Cretaceous of China
TLDR
One of the earliest known beaked ornithurine birds from the Lower Cretaceous deposits in Liaoning, northeast China is reported, with a rhynchokinetic skull with toothless jaws and over three dozen preserved gizzard stones, suggesting an herbivorous diet.
A bizarre Jurassic maniraptoran from China with elongate ribbon-like feathers
TLDR
This finding shows that a member of the avialan lineage experimented with integumentary ornamentation as early as the Middle to Late Jurassic, and provides further evidence relating to this aspect of the transition from non-avian theropods to birds.
Early diversification of birds: Evidence from a new opposite bird
TLDR
The new bird represents a new ecological type different from all known members of Enantiornithes, and shows that enantiornithines had probably originated earlier than the Early Cretaceous, or this group had experienced a rapid radiation right after it first occurred in the early EarlyCretaceous.
Mesozoic birds of China—a synoptic review
TLDR
A synoptic review of the discoveries and studies of Chinese Mesozoic birds is provided, showing that the advantage of birds in the competitions with other vertebrate groups such as pterosaurs had probably not only resulted in the rapid differentiation and radiation of birds but also the worldwide spreading of pterosaurus and other vertebrates from East Asia in the Early Cretaceous.
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