Frouke Hermens

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Visual backward masking is a versatile tool for understanding principles and limitations of visual information processing in the human brain. However, the mechanisms underlying masking are still poorly understood. In the current contribution, the authors show that a structurally simple mathematical model can explain many spatial and temporal effects in(More)
V. Di Lolo, J. T. Enns, and R. A. Rensink (2000) reported properties of masking that they claimed were inconsistent with all current models. The current authors show, through computer simulation, that many current models can account for V. Di Lollo et al.'s (2000) data. Although V. Di Lollo et al. (2000) argued that their data could be accounted for only(More)
Various models have been proposed in the literature to explain the control of human arm movements. To make a quantitative comparison between the predictions of various models, we tested subjects for movements to targets on a vertical screen in various conditions. Subjects were asked to move directly from one target to another, or to move by a via-point, at(More)
Perceiving someone's averted eye-gaze is thought to result in an automatic shift of attention and in the preparation of an oculomotor response in the direction of perceived gaze. Although gaze cues have been regarded as being special in this respect, recent studies have found evidence for automatic attention shifts with nonsocial stimuli, such as arrow(More)
In this study we investigated the perception and production of line orientations in a vertical plane. Previous studies have shown that systematic errors are made when participants have to match oblique orientations visually and haptically. Differences in the setup for visual and haptic matching did not allow for a quantitative comparison of the errors. To(More)
In masked priming, responses are often speeded when primes are similar to targets ('positive compatibility effect'). However, sometimes similarity of prime and target impairs responses ('negative compatibility effect'). A similar distinction has been found for the curvature of saccade trajectories. Here, we test whether the same inhibition processes are(More)
In backward visual masking, it is common to find that the mask has its biggest effect when it follows the target by several tens of milliseconds. Research in the 1960s and 1970s suggested that masking effects were best characterized by the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between the target and mask. In particular, one claim has been that the SOA for which(More)
The human brain analyzes a visual object first by basic feature detectors. On the objects way to a conscious percept, these features are integrated in subsequent stages of the visual hierarchy. The time course of this feature integration is largely unknown. To shed light on the temporal dynamics of feature integration, we applied transcranial magnetic(More)
The origin of motion illusions in simple black and white patterns such those as used by Op artists has been at the center of a lively scientific debate, relating motion processing mechanisms to involuntary eye movements that generate characteristic motion patterns. To overcome the limitations of using subjective ratings as a measure of illusory effects, we(More)
Simultaneous and temporal masking are two frequently used techniques in psychology and vision science. Although there are many studies and theories related to each masking technique, there are no systematic investigations of their mutual relationship, even though both techniques are often applied together. Here, the authors show that temporal masking can(More)