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Visual backward masking is a versatile tool for understanding principles and limitations of visual information processing in the human brain. However, the mechanisms underlying masking are still poorly understood. In the current contribution, the authors show that a structurally simple mathematical model can explain many spatial and temporal effects in(More)
V. Di Lolo, J. T. Enns, and R. A. Rensink (2000) reported properties of masking that they claimed were inconsistent with all current models. The current authors show, through computer simulation, that many current models can account for V. Di Lollo et al.'s (2000) data. Although V. Di Lollo et al. (2000) argued that their data could be accounted for only(More)
Although the visual system can achieve a coarse classification of its inputs in a relatively short time, the synthesis of qualia-rich and detailed percepts can take substantially more time. If these prolonged computations were to take place in a retinotopic space, moving objects would generate extensive smear. However, under normal viewing conditions,(More)
How the visual brain integrates temporally dispersed information is an open question. Often, it is assumed that the visual system simply sums light over a certain period of time (e.g. Bloch's law). However, in feature fusion, information presented later dominates, suggesting complex temporal dynamics that cannot be described by simple energy summation. For(More)
Perceiving someone's averted eye-gaze is thought to result in an automatic shift of attention and in the preparation of an oculomotor response in the direction of perceived gaze. Although gaze cues have been regarded as being special in this respect, recent studies have found evidence for automatic attention shifts with nonsocial stimuli, such as arrow(More)
In backward visual masking, it is common to find that the mask has its biggest effect when it follows the target by several tens of milliseconds. Research in the 1960s and 1970s suggested that masking effects were best characterized by the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between the target and mask. In particular, one claim has been that the SOA for which(More)
In three experiments, we investigated the structure of frontoparallel haptic space. In the first experiment, we asked blindfolded participants to rotate a matching bar so that it felt parallel to the reference bar, the bars could be at various positions in the frontoparallel plane. Large systematic errors were observed, in which orientations that were(More)
When we fixate an object, our eyes are not entirely still, but undergo small displacements such as microsaccades. Here, we investigate whether these microsaccades are sensitive to the preparatory processes involved in programming a saccade. We show that the frequency of microsaccades depends in a specific manner on the intention where to move the eyes(More)
To investigate the mechanisms of perceptual learning, we recently introduced a paradigm in which incorrect, reverse feedback followed after some but not all vernier presentations. This feedback paradigm exerted a strong effect on performance that seemed to bias decisions rather than to yield perceptual learning. Here, we show that observers can develop(More)
In spite of more than 100 years of research, the mechanisms underlying visual masking are still unknown. In recent publications, we introduced an unmasking paradigm involving the fusion of features that revealed interesting spatial characteristics. Here, we investigate the temporal aspects of this paradigm showing very long lasting effects that impose(More)